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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wapato, Washington » Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #303654

Research Project: Biorational Management of Insect Pests of Temperate Tree Fruits

Location: Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research

Title: Detection of an apple-infesting popoulation of Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) 1867 (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the state of Colorado, USA

Author
item Hood, Glen - University Of Notre Dame
item Glover, Mary - University Of Notre Dame
item Tait, Cheyenne - University Of Notre Dame
item Yee, Wee
item Feder, Jeffery - University Of Notre Dame

Submitted to: Pan Pacific Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/4/2013
Publication Date: 4/25/2014
Citation: Hood, G.R., Glover, M., Tait, C., Yee, W.L., Feder, J. 2014. Detection of an apple-infesting popoulation of Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) 1867 (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the state of Colorado, USA. Pan Pacific Entomology. 90(1):4-10.

Interpretive Summary: The apple maggot fly is a major quarantine pest of apple in the western U.S. Knowledge of its distribution in the West can help with management efforts because it affects movement of potentially infested apples. Scientists at the University of Notre Dame, IN and the USDA-ARS Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory in Wapato, WA determined the presence of the fly in Colorado. We surveyed non-commercial apples at 16 locations in eight counties across that state and discovered one apple maggot infestation of fruit in Boulder in close proximity to wild hawthorn. Our finding is the first confirmed infestation of apple in the state in 25 years, and affirms the need to continue spraying when apple maggots are trapped near orchards in Colorado.

Technical Abstract: The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) 1867 (Tephritidae), is an economically important pest of apples (Malus domesica Borkh.) (Rosaceae) throughout much of the United States. The fly is endemic to the eastern U.S., where its primary host plants are several species of native hawthorns (Crataegus) (Rosaceae). About 150 years ago the fly shifted to apples in the Northeast. More recently, the fly has been introduced to the western U.S. outside of its native range. In the state of Colorado, R. pomonella has been documented to attack the fruits of a number of different native and introduced hawthorn species, but is generally absent from apples. While orchards in apple growing regions are closely monitored, backyard and non-commercial apples often go largely unexamined. Here, we report results from a survey of non-commercial apples at 16 locations in eight counties across Colorado. We document the discovery of one R. pomonella infestation of apple at low density in Boulder, Colorado in close proximity to highly attacked, introduced downy hawthorn (C. mollis Scheele) in a residential neighborhood. Our finding represents the first confirmed infestation of apple in the state in 25 years. We discuss the implication of our findings for apple maggot management.