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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED APPROACHES FOR IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY OF MORONE AND OTHER WARM WATER FISH PRODUCTION

Location: Harry K. Dupree Stuttgart National Aquaculture Research Cntr

Title: Evaluation of plant and animal protein sources as partial or total replacement of fish meal in diets for juvenile Nile tilapia

Author
item Thompson, Kenneth
item Velasquez, Alejandro
item Patterson, Joshua
item Webster, Carl

Submitted to: Popular Publication
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/15/2013
Publication Date: 3/6/2014
Citation: Thompson, K.R., Velasquez, Patterson, J.T., Webster, C.D. 2014. Evaluation of plant and animal protein sources as partial or total replacement of fish meal in diets for juvenile Nile tilapia. Kentuck Aquatic Farming. 27(1):Winter 2013-2014.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: A feeding trial was conducted in a closed system with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) juveniles (mean weight, 2.84 g) to examine the effects of total replacement of fish meal (FM), with and without supplementation of DL-methionine (Met) and L-lysine (Lys), by plant protein sources. Fish were fed six isoenergetic (AE = 4.0 kcal/g of diet) and isoproteic (35% protein as fed basis) practical diets containing protein primarily from soybean meal (SBM), soybean protein concentrate (SPC), feed-grade poultry by-product meal (PBM), or combinations of those ingredients. After 7 weeks, mean final weight, percentage weight gain (PWG), and amount of diet fed for fish fed diets 1 (control with 20% FM) and 6 (with 20% SPC and 20% PBM) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with juveniles fed all other diets. Feed conversion ratio (FCR) was similar among treatments, but fish fed diet 5 (with 36% SPC and 0% FM) recorded the highest FCR value. Likewise, protein efficiency ratio (PER) was similar among treatments; however, PER in juveniles fed diet 3 (with 52% SBM and 0% FM) and diet 5 were significantly lower than in fish fed all other diets. Overall, no significant (P > 0.05) difference was found in percent survival, which averaged 92.6% among all diets fed. These data suggest that Nile tilapia fry cannot utilize diets containing high levels (>75%) of SBM when no animal protein ingredient is added, even with supplemental Met and Lys. However, a diet containing 20% SPC and 20% feed-grade PBM appears to be suitable for juvenile Nile tilapia, which may help reduce diet costs and allow for sustainable production.

Last Modified: 10/16/2017
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