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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » National Clonal Germplasm Repository » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #303491

Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Conservation of citrus germplasm - an international survey

Author
item ROOS, MICHAEL - University Of California
item GMITTER, F. - University Of Florida
item Lee, Richard
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/15/2014
Publication Date: 11/1/2015
Citation: Roos, M., Gmitter, F., Lee, R.F., Hummer, K.E. 2015. Conservation of citrus germplasm - an international survey. Acta Horticulturae. An International Survey. Acta Hort. 1101:33-38. doi 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1101.6.

Interpretive Summary: Citrus is an economically important tree fruit crop in many subtropical and tropical areas. Most cultivated species likely originated in Southern China, Northeast India and Southeast Asia. Many species are inter-fertile and some cultivated citrus types including sweet orange, lemon and grapefruit, are complex interspecific hybrids. The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGR) now recognizes Citrus as an Annex I crop, and therefore a global conservation strategy is needed. Toward this end, a survey of citrus germplasm collections throughout the world was initiated in 2012. We summarize results of this survey which documents diversity in various collections and indicates which collections are at risk. The survey includes information on the number of accessions in each collection and how accessions are grouped among commercial cultivars, clonal and seedling accessions from farms, other Citrus species, and wild relatives in other genera. Gaps in the diversity of the collections will be identified. Problems with pests and diseases, extent of duplication, and how extensively the collection has been characterized for taxonomic, molecular and performance traits will also be summarized. Use of each collection for breeding, exchange and distribution will be characterized. Finally, data on financial and management challenges will be valuable in identifying priorities for additional investment in existing collections. The results of this survey will enable the citrus community to develop a strategic plan to safeguard genetic diversity in citrus. This strategy will be implemented through collaboration among citrus researchers, the ISHS, and the Global Crop Diversity Trust.

Technical Abstract: Citrus is an economically important tree fruit crop in many subtropical and tropical areas. Most cultivated species likely originated in Southern China, Northeast India and Southeast Asia. Many species are inter-fertile and some cultivated citrus types including sweet orange, lemon and grapefruit, are complex interspecific hybrids. The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGR) now recognizes Citrus as an Annex I crop, and therefore a global conservation strategy is needed. Toward this end, a survey of citrus germplasm collections throughout the world was initiated in 2012. We summarize results of this survey which documents diversity in various collections and indicates which collections are at risk. The survey includes information on the number of accessions in each collection and how accessions are grouped among commercial cultivars, clonal and seedling accessions from farms, other Citrus species, and wild relatives in other genera. Gaps in the diversity of the collections will be identified. Problems with pests and diseases, extent of duplication, and how extensively the collection has been characterized for taxonomic, molecular and performance traits will also be summarized. Use of each collection for breeding, exchange and distribution will be characterized. Finally, data on financial and management challenges will be valuable in identifying priorities for additional investment in existing collections. The results of this survey will enable the citrus community to develop a strategic plan to safeguard genetic diversity in citrus. This strategy will be implemented through collaboration among citrus researchers, the ISHS, and the Global Crop Diversity Trust.