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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Sunflower and Plant Biology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #303030

Research Project: Sunflower Genetic Improvement with Genes from Wild Crop Relatives and Domesticated Sunflower

Location: Sunflower and Plant Biology Research

Title: Registration of two confection sunflower germplasm Lines, HA-R10 and HA-R11, Resistant to sunflower rust

Author
item Qi, Lili
item Gong, Li - North Dakota State University
item Markell, Sam - North Dakota State University
item Seiler, Gerald
item Gulya Jr, Thomas
item Hulke, Brent

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/4/2014
Publication Date: 8/25/2014
Citation: Qi, L., Gong, L., Markell, S.G., Seiler, G.J., Gulya Jr, T.J., Hulke, B.S. 2014. Registration of two confection sunflower germplasm Lines, HA-R10 and HA-R11, Resistant to sunflower rust. Journal of Plant Registrations. 8:329-333. DOI: 10.3198/jpr2014.02.0010crg.

Interpretive Summary: Sunflower is an important crop that can be found in most areas of the world. Based on their end use, sunflower hybrids are generally classified as either oil- or confection-type sunflowers. Oilseed sunflowers are used in both birdfeed and the crushing industry for oil, whereas the non-oil or confection-type sunflowers are used in food products, and as snacks or condiments for human consumption. Sunflower rust is a serious disease that has been increasingly prevalent in much of the U.S. sunflower producing region. Developing genetic rust resistance in confection hybrids is the most effective and economic solution for producers. However, the lack of diverse resistance sources makes confection sunflower more susceptible to rust and risks a potential disease epidemic from the use of a single resistance gene. Two confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm lines, HA-R10 (Reg. No.xxx, PI 670043) and HA-R11 (Reg. No.xxx, PI 670044) were developed by the USDA-ARS Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and released December, 2013. The rust resistance gene R5 in HA-R10 and R4 in HA-R11 were introduced from oilseed lines HA-R2 and HA-R3, respectively, with the two confection sunflower populations, CONFSCLB1 and CONFSCLR5, as the recurrent parents. The HA-R10 and HA-R11 are visually similar to the recurrent parents, but possess the rust resistance gene(s) transferred from oilseed sunflower. These sources will afford confection sunflower breeders an opportunity to incorporate rust resistance genes into their parental lines, thus facilitating the development of disease-resistant hybrids.

Technical Abstract: Two confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm lines, HA-R10 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670043) and HA-R11 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670044) were developed by the USDA-ARS Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and released December, 2013. Sunflower rust (caused by Puccinia helianthi Schwein.) is an emerging production issue for confection sunflower in North America due to spread of new rust races and lack of resistance sources. HA-R10 is a BC3F3-derived BC3F4 maintainer line of confection sunflower selected from the cross CONFSCLB1*4/ HA-R2, and HA-R11 is a BC4F3-derived BC4F4 restorer line of confection sunflower selected from the cross CONFSCLR5*5/HA-R3. The rust resistance gene R5 in HA-R10 and R4 in HA-R11 were introduced from oilseed lines HA-R2 and HA-R3, respectively, with the two confection sunflower populations, CONFSCLB1 and CONFSCLR5, as the recurrent parents. Greenhouse testing of rust resistance and DNA markers were used during development and progeny testing of the germplasm lines. The HA-R10 and HA-R11 are visually similar to the recurrent parents, but possess the rust resistance gene(s) transferred from oilseed sunflower. These sources will afford confection sunflower breeders an opportunity to incorporate rust resistance genes into their parental lines, thus facilitating the development of disease-resistant hybrids.