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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Oxford, Mississippi » Natural Products Utilization Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #301630

Research Project: Discovery and Development of Natural Product-based Weed Management Methods

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Cantharidin, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, strongly upregulates detoxification enzymes in the Arabidopsis proteome

Author
item Bajsa, Joanna - Former ARS Employee
item Pan, Zhiqiang - Peter
item Duke, Stephen

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Physiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/7/2014
Publication Date: 1/15/2015
Citation: Bajsa, J., Pan, Z., Duke, S.O. 2015. Cantharidin, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, strongly upregulates detoxification enzymes in the Arabidopsis proteome. Journal of Plant Physiology. 173:33-40.

Interpretive Summary: Cantharidin is a potent natural herbicide. This work was conducted to probe its mode of action. We previously published its effect on transcription of plant genes (mRNA production) with transcriptomic methods. This paper follows up and looks at cantharidin effects translation of mRNA using proteomic methods. There was surprisingly little correlation between previous transcriptome results and the proteome results of this study. Abundance of only a relatively few proteins were found to be affected by cantharidin, compared to effects on transcription of a large number of genes found in the same experiment. Xenobiotic detoxification proteins, such as glutathione S-transferases, were the must upregulated proteins in response to cantharidin. The target enzyme of cantharidin was only increased in abundance a 2 h after exposure to the toxin.

Technical Abstract: Cantharidin is a potent natural herbicide. This work was conducted to probe its mode of action. We previously published its effect on transcription of plant genes (mRNA production) with transcriptomic methods. This paper follows up and looks at cantharidin effects translation of mRNA using proteomic methods. There was surprisingly little correlation between previous transcriptome results and the proteome results of this study. Abundance of only a relatively few proteins were found to be affected by cantharidin, compared to effects on transcription of a large number of genes found in the same experiment. Xenobiotic detoxification proteins, such as glutathione S-transferases, were the must upregulated proteins in response to cantharidin. The target enzyme of cantharidin was only increased in abundance a 2 h after exposure to the toxin.