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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Bioenergy Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #300496

Title: Fouling of evaporators in maize processing developing a fundamental understanding

Author
item Rausch, K - University Of Illinois
item Challa, R - University Of Illinois
item Zhang, Y - University Of Illinois
item Johnston, David
item Dien, Bruce
item Singh, V - University Of Illinois
item Tumbleson, M - University Of Illinois

Submitted to: Proceedings of the International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/9/2013
Publication Date: 6/9/2013
Citation: Rausch, K.D., Challa, R.K., Zhang, Y.A., Johnston, D., Dien, B.S., Singh, V.J., Tumbleson, M.E. 2013. Fouling of evaporators in maize processing developing a fundamental understanding. Proceedings of the International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Evaporator fouling is a common, chronic problem during maize starch and ethanol production. To compensate for the consequences of fouling, capital costs are increased, operating costs are incurred, productivity is reduced and environmental impact is increased. Despite these issues, fundamental causes of increased fouling in maize processes are not understood. Process streams are biological in origin and have variable compositions. The objective was to develop an improved understanding of components that accelerate fouling in maize processing evaporators. Two experiments were performed with commercial and model processing streams. In the first experiment, we used model materials (starch and sucrose) to study fouling characteristics of streams having well defined compositions. In a second experiment, commercial thin stillage samples were treated by adding carbohydrate materials (starch and sucrose) and tested in a fouling rig to simulate variation in composition. In the first experiment, sucrose had smaller effects than granular starch on heat transfer fouling. In the second experiment, inclusion of granular starch in thin stillage increased the rates of fouling. These introductory results have broad implications on process strategies.