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Research Project: Innovations that Improve the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Managing and Preserving Ex Situ Plant Germplasm Collections

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Title: Potential applications of cryogenic technologies to plant genetic improvement and pathogen eradication

Author
item WANG, BIAO - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item WANG, REN-RUI - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item CUI, ZHEN-HUA - Northwest Agricultural & Forestry University
item LI, JING-WEI - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item BI, WEN-LU - Northwest Agricultural & Forestry University
item LI, BAI-QUAN - Northwest Agricultural & Forestry University
item OZUDOGRU, ELIF AYLIN - National Research Council - Italy
item Volk, Gayle
item WANG, QIAO-CHUN - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University

Submitted to: Biotechnology Advances
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/13/2014
Publication Date: 3/26/2014
Citation: Wang, B., Wang, R., Cui, Z., Li, J., Bi, W., Li, B., Ozudogru, E., Volk, G.M., Wang, Q. 2014. Potential applications of cryogenic technologies to plant genetic improvement and pathogen eradication. Biotechnology Advances. 32(3):583-595. DOI: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2014.03.003.

Interpretive Summary: The global human population was only about 3.3 billion 45 years ago, but is now more than 7 billion and is expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050. It will be a challenge to provide adequate quantities of food to this rapidly growing population. Sustainable development of agricultural production by continuous breeding of more productive cultivars and by increasing the productive potential of existing cultivars can help meet this demand. The present paper provides information on the potential uses of cryogenic techniques in ensuring food security. Cryogenic technology refers to treating regenerative plant tissues with liquid nitrogen, and then subsequently recovering them. This technology can be used for the long-term storage of diverse plant genetic resources within gene banks, improving transformation efficiencies, producing and maintaining protoplasts, and efficiently producing pathogen-free plants. These roles demonstrate that cryogenic technologies offer opportunities to ensure food security.

Technical Abstract: The global human population was only about 3.3 billion 45 years ago, but is now more than 7 billion and is expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050. It will be a challenge to provide adequate quantities of food to this rapidly growing population. Sustainable development of agricultural production by continuous breeding of more productive cultivars and by increasing the productive potential of existing cultivars can help meet this demand. The present paper provides information on the potential uses of cryogenic techniques in ensuring food security. Key roles of cryogenic technologies identified over the past decade include: (1) long-term conservation of a diverse germplasm and successful establishment of cryo-banks; (2) maintenance of the regenerative ability of embryogenic tissues that are frequently the target for genetic transformation; (3) enhancement of genetic transformation and plant regeneration of transformed cells, and safe, long-term conservation for transgenic materials; (4) production and maintenance of viable protoplasts for plastid transformation; and (5) efficient production of pathogen-free plants. These roles demonstrate that cryogenic technologies offer opportunities to ensure food security.