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Title: Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite loci in two species of burrowing shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis

Author
item Dumbauld, Brett
item Mercer, Dacey
item CAMARA, MARK - Cawthron Institute

Submitted to: Conservation Genetics Resources
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/10/2013
Publication Date: 6/1/2014
Citation: Dumbauld, B.R., Mercer, D.M., Camara, M.D. 2014. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite loci in two species of burrowing shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis. Conservation Genetics Resources. 9(2):353-356.

Interpretive Summary: Burrowing thalassinid shrimp are recognized as important ecosystem engineers because they turn over the sediemt and greatly influence the composition of marine benthic communities they inhabit. We isolatied and characterized several microsatellite loci from two species of burrowing shrimp , Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis which inhabit estuaries along the U.S. Pacific Coast. Populations of these shrimp are of current management concern due to declining abundance and their influence on shellfish aquaculture. Genetic variability was assessed using two populations for each shrimp species. All loci were variable with the number of alleles ranging from three to 22 per locus, and observed heterozygosity varied from 0.22 to 1.00. There were only four instances of deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations and no linkage disequilibrium. These are the first microsatellites characterized for these two species of thalassinid shrimp and should provide a useful genetic tool for further characterization of population structure and diversity.

Technical Abstract: Thalassinid shrimp are recognized as important ecosystem engineers due to their ability to influence the benthic communities they inhabit We describe the isolation and characterization of several microsatellite loci from two species, Neotrypaea californiensis Upogebia pugettensis which inhabit estuaries along the U.S. Pacific Coast whose populations are of current management concern due to declining abundance and their influence on shellfish aquaculture. Genetic variability was assessed using two populations for each shrimp species. All loci were variable with the number of alleles ranging from three to 22 per locus, and observed heterozygosity varying from 0.22 to 1.00. There were only four instances of deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations and no linkage disequilibrium. These are the first microsatellites characterized for these two species of thalassinid shrimp and should provide a useful genetic tool for further characterization of population structure and diversity.