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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #299220

Research Project: Postharvest Sensory, Processing and Packaging of Catfish

Location: Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research

Title: Improving the Analysis of Anthocyanidins from Blueberries Using Response Surface Methodology

Author
item Lloyd, Steven
item Grimm, Casey
item Bett Garber, Karen
item Beaulieu, John
item Boykin, Deborah - Debbie

Submitted to: The Open Plant Science Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/25/2016
Publication Date: 9/9/2016
Citation: Lloyd, S.W., Grimm, C.C., Bett Garber, K.L., Beaulieu, J.C., Boykin, D.L. 2016. Improving the Analysis of Anthocyanidins from Blueberries Using Response Surface Methodology. The Open Plant Science Journal. 9:41-52.

Interpretive Summary: We investigated the factors influencing the hydrolytic conversion efficiency of anthocyanidins to anthocyanins and determine the optimum set of conditions that will maximize the recovery of anthocyanidins. Recovery can be maximized using this procedure: Freeze-dry homogenized fruit and extract with methanol:water:TFA, place 1 mL extract or juice in a test tube and add 440 µL 37% HCl, purge the tube with N2, seal with a PTFE lined cap, vortex, then heat at 99°C for 6.4 minutes. Filter the hydrolysate into an autosampler vial and analyze by UPLC. Maximizing the recovery of anthocyanidins leads to a more accurate measure of the anthocyanidins present in blueberries. This allows food scientists to determine if the health-promoting chemicals in blueberries are also present in value added products such as juices and dried berries.

Technical Abstract: Background: Recent interest in the health promoting potential of anthocyanins points to the need for robust and reliable analytical methods. It is essential to know that the health promoting chemicals are present in juices and other products processed from whole fruit. Many different methods have been published using a wide variety of conditions for the hydrolysis of anthocyanins to anthocyanidins. Objective: To investigate the factors influencing the hydrolytic conversion efficiency. The optimum set of conditions will maximize the recovery of anthocyanidins. Method: Extraction procedure (freeze drying vs. direct liquid extraction), heating method (reflux vs. sealed vial), nitrogen purging and acid type were investigated. Response surface methodology was then used to find the optimum combination of incubation time, acid concentration and incubation temperature. Results: Anthocyanidin recovery can be maximized using this procedure: Freeze-dry homogenized fruit and extract with methanol:water:TFA, place 1 mL extract or juice in a test tube and add 440 µL 37% HCl, purge the tube with N2, seal with a PTFE lined cap, vortex, then heat at 99°C for 6.4 minutes. Filter the hydrolysate into an autosampler vial and analyze by UPLC immediately. Conclusion: Maximizing the recovery of anthocyanidins (by manipulating conditions in order to maximize peak areas) leads to a more accurate measure of the anthocyanidins present in blueberries.