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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Hard Winter Wheat to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

Location: Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research

Title: Transient heat-stress compromises the resistance of wheat seedlings to Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) infestation)

Author
item Currie, Yaleaka
item Moch, John
item Underwood, Joshua
item Kharabsheh, Hamzah
item Quesenberry, Amy
item Miyagi, Risa
item Thomas, Carolyn
item Boney, Melanie
item Wood, Samantha
item Chen, Ming-shun
item Zhu, Lieceng

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/22/2013
Publication Date: 2/1/2014
Citation: Currie, Y., Moch, J., Underwood, J., Kharabsheh, H., Quesenberry, A., Miyagi, R., Thomas, C., Boney, M., Wood, S., Chen, M., Zhu, L. 2014. Transient heat-stress compromises the resistance of wheat seedlings to Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) infestation. Journal of Economic Entomology. 107(1):389-395.

Interpretive Summary: Hessian fly is a major insect pest of wheat, and is mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars to the field. Temperature affects host plant resistance to Hessian fly and global climate change threatens future success of the host plant resistance strategy. In this study, we investigated the impact of heat-stress on the resistance of the wheat line 'Molly', which contains the resistance gene H13, to an avirulent Hessian fly population. We found that a significant portion of Molly seedlings stressed at 40°C for six hours at or after initial Hessian fly larval attack became susceptible to otherwise avirulent insects, whereas un-stressed control plants remained 100% resistant. Biochemical analysis revealed that heat stress causes significant changes in phytohormones that regulate plant resistance. This research is a step forward to reveal the molecular mechanism of heat-stress on wheat resistance to Hessian fly infestation.

Technical Abstract: Heat-stress exerts profound impact on resistance of plants to parasites. In this research, we investigated the impact of an acute, transient heat-stress on the resistance of the wheat line 'Molly', which contains the resistance gene H13, to an avirulent Hessian fly [Mayetiola destructor (Say)] population. We found that a significant portion of Molly seedlings stressed at 40°C for six hours at or after initial Hessian fly larval attack became susceptible to otherwise avirulent insects, whereas un-stressed control plants remained 100% resistant. Specifically, 77.8%, 73.3%, 83.3%, and 46.7% of plants heat-stressed at 0 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h, respectively, after initial Hessian fly larval attack became susceptible. Biochemical analysis revealed that heat stress caused a transient decrease in 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), but an increase in salicylic acid (SA) accumulation in Molly plants. The change in phytohormones following heat-stress and Hessian fly infestation was not observed in Newton seedlings, an isogenic but Hessian fly susceptible wheat line. Instead, heat treatment caused a relatively prolonged reduction in palmitoleic acid (FA16:1). The role of phytohormones in heat-induced loss of wheat resistance was discussed.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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