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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Urbana, Illinois » Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #297761

Research Project: IMPROVED RESISTANCE TO SOYBEAN PATHOGENS AND PESTS

Location: Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research

Title: Soybean aphid intrabiotype variability based on colonization of specific soybean genotypes

Author
item Pawlowski, Michelle - University Of Illinois
item Hill, Curt - University Of Illinois
item Voegtlin, David - University Of Illinois
item Hartman, Glen

Submitted to: Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/8/2014
Publication Date: 2/1/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/60215
Citation: Pawlowski, M., Hill, C.B., Voegtlin, D., Hartman, G.L. 2015. Soybean aphid intrabiotype variability based on colonization of specific soybean genotypes. Insect Science. 22(1):1-8.

Interpretive Summary: The soybean aphid first arrived in North America in 2000 and has since become one of the most important insect pests of domestic soybean, causing significant yield loss and increasing production costs annually in the northern soybean production states in the USA. Since its arrival in 2000, four biotypes have been identified. Host resistance is the most sustainable method for managing this pest and researchers continue to survey for new soybean aphid biotypes to determine demographics and potential biotypes that are able to overcome soybean aphid resistance (Rag) genes. The objective of this study was to characterize virulence of seven soybean aphid isolates recently collected in the North Central region of the US to determine if there were any new soybean aphid biotypes. An isolate from the Western region of Illinois was found to differentiate from biotypes 1 and 2 due to its ability to colonize Rag2. Non-choice tests were done to differentiate the aphid isolate from biotype 3. Significant differences were found between the aphid isolates, the soybean genotypes, and the isolate x genotype interaction on soybean cultivars that had either Rag1 or Rag3 resistance. Along with these characterizations and differences in virulence compared with biotype 4 on Rag1 and Rag3, it was concluded that the islate referred to as the Quad Cities West Blackhawk isolate was a new soybean aphid biotype. This review will be useful for soybean breeders, entomologist, and those interested in insect population dynamics.

Technical Abstract: The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera; Aphididae) is the most destructive insect pest on soybeans in the United States. Since its arrival in 2000, four biotypes have been identified. Host resistance is the most sustainable method for managing this pest and researchers continue to survey for new soybean aphid biotypes to determine demographics and potential biotypes that are able to overcome soybean aphid resistance (Rag) genes. The objective of this study was to characterize virulence of seven soybean aphid isolates recently collected in the North Central region of the US to determine if there were any new soybean aphid biotypes. Among the seven, an isolate from the Western region of Illinois was found to differentiate from biotypes 1 and 2 due to its ability to colonize Rag2. Non-choice tests were done to differentiate the aphid isolate from biotype 3. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between the aphid isolates, the soybean genotypes, and the isolate x genotype interaction on soybean cultivars that had either Rag1 or Rag3 resistance, with the Western Illinois isolate, referred to as the Quad Cities West Blackhawk isolate, being the least aggressive of the two. Along with these characterizations and differences in virulence compared with biotype 4 on Rag1 and Rag3, it was concluded that the Quad Cities West Blackhawk isolate was a new soybean aphid biotype.