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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #293566

Title: Developing trap cropping systems for effective organic management of key insect pests of cucurbit crops (IPM)

Author
item PINERO, JAIME - Lincoln University Of Missouri
item WILSON, J. - Lincoln University Of Missouri
item Legaspi, Jesusa - Susie
item Miller, Neil
item HOSSAIN, TANJIM - University Of South Florida

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/25/2013
Publication Date: 6/18/2013
Citation: Pinero, J.C., Wilson, J., Legaspi, J.C., Miller, N.W., Hossain, T. 2013. Developing trap cropping systems for effective organic management of key insect pests of cucurbit crops (IPM)[abstract]. Association of 1890 Research Directors (ARD) 17th Biennial Research Symposium. p.115-116.

Interpretive Summary: Trap cropping is a behaviorally-based pest management approach that functions by planting highly attractive plants next to a higher value crop so as to attract the pest to the trap crop plants, thus preventing or making less likely the arrival of the pest to the main crop (= cash crop). In 2012, a series of studies aimed at comparing the effectiveness of Blue Hubbard squash, Red Kuri Hubbard, and Buttercup squash as trap crops to manage 3 key insect pests of cucurbits in organic systems were conducted in Missouri and Florida. The three key insect pests targeted were spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardii ), striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum) (both Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and squash bug (Anasa tristis) (Heteroptera: Coreidae). Our results indicate that significantly fewer insect pests were consistently recorded on a per plant basis in the cash crop (zucchini) compared to the trap crops, indicating excellent performance of trap crop plants at attracting multiple insect pest species. For cucumber beetles trap crop performance was better early in the season compared to late in the season due to the presence of attractive flowers in the cash crop, but for squash bug all trap crop species performed equally well throughout the season.

Technical Abstract: Trap cropping is a behaviorally-based pest management approach that functions by planting highly attractive plants next to a higher value crop so as to attract the pest to the trap crop plants, thus preventing or making less likely the arrival of the pest to the main crop (= cash crop). In 2012, a series of studies aimed at comparing the effectiveness of Blue Hubbard squash, Red Kuri Hubbard, and Buttercup squash as trap crops to manage 3 key insect pests of cucurbits in organic systems were conducted in Missouri and Florida. The three key insect pests targeted were spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardii ), striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum) (both Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and squash bug (Anasa tristis) (Heteroptera: Coreidae). Our results indicate that significantly fewer insect pests were consistently recorded on a per plant basis in the cash crop (zucchini) compared to the trap crops, indicating excellent performance of trap crop plants at attracting multiple insect pest species. For cucumber beetles trap crop performance was better early in the season compared to late in the season due to the presence of attractive flowers in the cash crop, but for squash bug all trap crop species performed equally well throughout the season.