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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Sunflower and Plant Biology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #292824

Title: Sunflower

Author
item Hulke, Brent
item Kleingartner, Larry - National Sunflower Association

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/14/2013
Publication Date: 5/12/2014
Citation: Hulke, B.S., Kleingartner, L.W. 2014. Sunflower. In: Smith, S., Diers, B., Specht, J., and Carver, B. editors. Yield Gains in Major U.S. Field Crops. CSSA Special Publications 33. Madison, WI: American Society of Agronomy, Inc., Crop Science Society of America, Inc., and Soil Science Society of America, Inc. pp.433-457.

Interpretive Summary: Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a species native to North America. It is a relatively new crop in the USA with commercialization starting around 1970. The high oil content sunflower seed changed the economics of producing and crushing sunflower seed for oil, making it attractive for growers. A number of production issues have been solved with cultural or chemical means, but many of the unique problems with sunflower production have been solved or will only be solvable with improved genetics of the crop. This book chapter provides details on how the crop has been improved, by improved genetics and production practices, and details what changes will need to be made in the future in order to keep the crop viable in the USA and the world.

Technical Abstract: Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a species native to North America. It is a relatively new crop in the USA with commercialization starting around 1970. The high oil content sunflower seed changed the economics of producing and crushing sunflower seed for oil, making it attractive for growers. A number of production issues have been solved with cultural or chemical means, but many of the unique problems with sunflower production have been solved or will only be solvable with improved genetics of the crop. This book chapter provides details on how the crop has been improved, by improved genetics and production practices, and details what changes will need to be made in the future in order to keep the crop viable in the USA and the world.