Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Assessment, Conservation and Management of Rangelands in Transition

Location: Watershed Management Research

Title: A decade of advancement in understanding of rangeland hydrology and erosion and the effects of conservation practices)

Author
item Pierson, Frederick - Fred
item Spaeth, Kenneth
item Williams, Christopher - Jason
item Al-hamdan, Osama

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/17/2013
Publication Date: 7/21/2013
Citation: Pierson, F.B., Spaeth, K.E., Williams, C.J., and Al-Hamdan, O.Z. 2013. A decade of advancement in understanding of rangeland hydrology and erosion and the effects of conservation practices [abstract]. Soil and Water Conservation Society 68th International Annual Conference, Resilient Landscapes: Planning for Food, Drought, and Fire, July 21-24, 2013, Reno, Nevada.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Over the past decade the USDA-ARS Northwest Watershed Research Center (NWRC) has conducted extensive field research to quantify hydrologic and erosion effects of rangeland conservation practices and to develop and advance tools for rangeland assessment and management. Much of what was previously known about rangeland hydrology was obtained from short-term, poorly replicated studies of small scale field plots and personal observations on gently sloping lands. Historical rangeland hydrologic models and land manager tools have been largely based on limited datasets and inferences from crop land studies. Data collected by the NWRC over the past decade has expanded the inference space to include steeply sloping sagebrush-steppe, pinyon and juniper woodlands, and the effects of wildfires, prescribed burning, and tree removal practices. Our presentation details consistent trends across a diverse domain and varying rangeland conditions based on more than 1000 artificial rainfall/overland flow experimental plots. We demonstrate how field data have advanced our understanding of rangeland hydrology and erosion and the effects of conservation practices. Finally, we briefly show how the well-replicated methodologies have contributed to advancements in rangeland hydrologic and erosion model developments targeted for private and governmental land managers.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
Footer Content Back to Top of Page