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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF FUMONISIN MYCOTOXIN CONTAMINATION IN MAIZE THROUGH ELUCIDATION OF GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ... METABOLISM IN FUSARIUM

Location: Mycotoxin Prevention and Applied Microbiology Research

Title: Comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete genomes reveals diversity and uniqueness of the phylum)

Author
item Riley, Robert
item Salamov, Asaf
item Otillar, Robert
item Fagnan, Kirsten
item Boussau, Bastien
item Brown, Daren
item Henrissat, Bernard
item Levasseur, Anthony
item Blanchette, Robert
item Morin, Emmanuelle

Submitted to: Fungal Genetics Conference/Asilomar
Publication Type: Abstract only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/17/2013
Publication Date: 3/17/2013
Citation: Riley, R., Salamov, A., Otillar, R., Fagnan, K., Boussau, B., Brown, D.W., Henrissat, B., Levasseur, A., Blanchette, R.A., Morin, E. 2013. Comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete genomes reveals diversity and uniqueness of the phylum. Fungal Genetics Conference/Asilomar.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37% of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycete fungi including 6 newly sequenced genomes. The genomes of basidiomycetes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. A phylogenetic tree of Basidiomycota was generated using the Phyldog method, which uses all available protein sequence data to simultaneously infer gene and species trees. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48% of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22%) comprised of proteins found in only one organism. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay among the members of Agaricomycotina subphylum. There is a correlation of the profile of certain gene families to nutritional mode in Agaricomycotina. Based on phylogenetically-informed principal component analysis (PCA) of such profiles, we predict Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots, and find the predictions to be supported by experiment. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no, or few, homologs suggests the high value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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