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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Kimberly, Idaho » Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #290736

Research Project: Improving Nutrient Utilization in Western Irrigated Crop Production Systems

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Effect of composting on the fate of steroids in beef cattle manure

Author
item Bartelt-hunt, Shannon - University Of Nebraska
item De Vivo, Shannon - University Of Nebraska
item Johnson, Leslie - University Of Nebraska
item Snow, Daniel - University Of Nebraska
item Kranz, William - University Of Nebraska
item Mader, Terry - Mader Consulting, Llc
item Shapiro, Charles - University Of Nebraska
item Van Donk, Simon - University Of Nebraska
item Shelton, David - University Of Nebraska
item Tarkalson, David
item Zhang, Tian - University Of Nebraska

Submitted to: Journal of Environmental Quality
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/28/2013
Publication Date: 6/24/2014
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/60058
Citation: Bartelt-Hunt, S.L., De Vivo, S., Johnson, L., Snow, D.D., Kranz, W.L., Mader, T.L., Shapiro, C.A., Van Donk, S.J., Shelton, D.P., Tarkalson, D.D., Zhang, T.C. 2013. Effect of composting on the fate of steroids in beef cattle manure. Journal of Environmental Quality. 42(4):1159-1166.

Interpretive Summary: The fate of steroid hormones in composted manure from beef cattle administered growth promotant substances was evaluated. The composting process resulted in the decomposition of half the manures original concentration of some steroid hormones in 8 to 69 days. This study showed that composting is an effective strategy to remove steroid hormones from manure. Total steroid hormone removal in composted beef cattle manure ranged from 79-87%.

Technical Abstract: In this study, the fate of steroid hormones in beef cattle manure composting is evaluated. The fate of 16 steroids and metabolites was evaluated in composted manure from beef cattle administered growth promotants and from beef cattle with no steroid hormone implants. The fate of estrogens (primary detected as estrone), androgens, progesterone, and the fusarium metabolite and implant a-zearalanol were monitored in manure compost piles. First-order decay rates were calculated for steroid half-lives in compost and ranged from 8 days for androsterone to 69 days for 4-androsterone. Other steroid concentration data did not fit first-order decay models which may indicate that other microbial processes may result in steroid production or synthesis in composting systems. We demonstrate that composting is an effective strategy to remove steroid hormones from manure. Total steroid hormone removal in composted beef cattle manure ranged from 79-87%.