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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance

Location: Healthy Body Weight Research

Title: Skin total carotenoids predict plasma carotenoid levels during a 28-week experimental feeding study with varying levels of vegetables and fruit)

Author
item Jahns, Lisa
item Whigham grendell, Leah
item Johnson, Luann
item Mayne, Susan
item Cartmel, Brenda
item Ermakov, Igor
item Gellermann, Werner

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/3/2012
Publication Date: 4/9/2013
Citation: Jahns, L.A., Whigham Grendell, L.D., Johnson, L.K., Mayne, S.T., Cartmel, B., Ermakov, I., Gellermann, W. 2013. Skin total carotenoids predict plasma carotenoid levels during a 28-week experimental feeding study with varying levels of vegetables and fruit. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 27:230.7.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Objective biomarkers are needed to assess adherence to vegetable and fruit intervention trials. This study compared plasma carotenoid concentrations to non-invasive skin carotenoid assessments. Thirty participants consumed a low-carotenoid diet (6 wk, Phases 1 & 3), a provided diet containing 6 c/day vegetables and fruit (8 wk, Phase 2) and their usual diet (final 8 wks, Phase 4). Skin was measured 5x/wk during Phase 2 and at least 2x/wk for the duration. Plasma carotenoids were measured at baseline and mid and end of each phase. Skin and plasma carotenoid levels decreased (p<0.01) by a third from baseline to end of phase 1, then increased (p<0.01) over 300% at end of phase 2. Plasma carotenoids returned to baseline concentrations at the end of phase 3 and skin carotenoid levels by end of phase 4. At baseline, skin and plasma total carotenoid values were significantly correlated (p <0.01). Skin carotenoid status significantly predicted plasma values using a mixed linear model including all 9 time points (p < 0.001), indicating that changes in skin carotenoid status closely follow changes in plasma across a broad range of intakes. At the individual level, skin carotenoids predicted plasma values as strongly (p < 0.001). This study supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective indicator for interventions involving carotenoids or fruit/vegetable intake. Support: USDA-ARS

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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