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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ANIMAL AND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION AND REDUCED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Location: Agroecosystems Management Research

Title: Supplemental lysine sulfate does not negatively affect performance of broiler chicks fed dietary sulfur from multiple dietary and water sources)

Author
item Bobeck, Elizabeth
item Payne, Rob
item Kerr, Brian
item Persia, Mike

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/1/2013
Publication Date: 9/10/2013
Citation: Bobeck, E., Payne, R.L., Kerr, B.J., Persia, M.E. 2013. Supplemental lysine sulfate does not negatively affect performance of broiler chicks fed dietary sulfur from multiple dietary and water sources. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. 22:461-468.

Interpretive Summary: Composition of commercial poultry diets may change depending on price of ingredients, and recently, the increasing production of corn-derived ethanol has created a surplus of the by-product dried distillers’ grains with solubles (DDGS). Since corn DDGS contains all of the nutrients from the grain in a concentrated form (except most of the starch), DDGS are a rich source of crude protein, amino acids, phosphate, and other nutrients. Corn naturally contains from 0.03-0.43% sulfur (S) and the fermentation and removal of starch from the corn during the ethanol production process concentrates that S to approximately 0.21-1.93%. In addition, S content in poultry drinking water varies across the USA, with the average drinking water content being approximately 32 mg/L, with 2,500 mg/L reported as the maximum acceptable level before high S water causes management problems. Concerns in reaching dietary S toxicity have arisen due to simultaneous high-S feed inputs (DDGS, lysine supplements, water) and input variation. Research results described in this report provides nutritionists at universities, feed companies, allied industries, and poultry production facilities data that excess S is easily excreted, and that under the experimental feeding conditions herein, supplementation with up to 1% additional lysine sulfate (or similar product) did not reduce performance in comparison with chicks fed a lower S diet with access to normal or high S water.

Technical Abstract: Commercial producers and nutritionists have questioned the performance consequences of sulfur (S) from various dietary and water sources combined in current commercial production. The combination of high S containing feed ingredients, including dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS) and dietary additives that contain S such as lysine sulfate or copper sulfate, has the potential to create high S exposure, especially when combined with high S drinking water. The tolerance of growing broiler chicks to S was determined by supplementation of a corn-soybean- 5% DDGS diet with up to 1% lysine sulfate or an equal amount of S from sodium sulfide. An additional diet containing copper and zinc sulfate served as a positive control for source of S and high S inclusion. These diets were fed to chicks provided with normal or high water S. We hypothesized that the addition of S sources to a commercial diet would not reduce the performance of growing chicks given access to normal or high S water. Data showed dietary S requirements were met and excess S was easily excreted, hence under the experimental feeding conditions, supplementation with up to 1% additional lysine sulfate (or similar product) did not reduce performance in comparison with chicks fed a lower S diet with access to normal or high S water. Analysis of the high S diet from copper and zinc sulfate suggests reduced water and feed consumption although there were no effects on chick weight gain.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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