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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Columbia, Missouri » Cropping Systems and Water Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #286928

Title: Long-term agroecosystem research in the Central Mississippi River Basin: Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed flow data

Author
item Baffaut, Claire
item Sadler, Edward
item Ghidey, Fessehaie

Submitted to: Journal of Environmental Quality
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/10/2014
Publication Date: 1/8/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/60166
Citation: Baffaut, C., Sadler, E.J., Ghidey, F. 2015. Long-term agroecosystem research in the Central Mississippi River Basin: Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed flow data. Journal of Environmental Quality. 44:18-27. DOI:10.2134/jeq2014.01.0008.

Interpretive Summary: Long-term monitoring of flow in agricultural watersheds is needed to assess the effects of changes in land use, land cover, and climate. Flow monitoring in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed started in 1971 at three nested watersheds with drainage areas ranging from 5 to 28 square miles. Since then, flow has been measured at 14 plots, 3 fields, and 12 additional stream sites on tributaries of Mark Twain Lake in the Central Mississippi River Basin. This paper describes the data collection methods, documents the data available and describes some of the main characteristics of flow at these scales. The paper supports the use of these flow data in research and as such benefits both scientists using the data, and those who in turn benefit from that research.

Technical Abstract: Flow monitoring in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed started in 1971 at three nested watersheds ranging from 12 to 73 km2 in drainage area. Since then, flow has been measured at 14 plots, 3 fields, and 12 additional stream sites ranging from 0.0034 to 6067 km2 in the Central Mississippi River Basin. The objectives of this paper are to 1) describe the data collection methods, 2) document the data available at the different scales, and 3) provide the main characteristics of flow at these scales.