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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Oxford, Mississippi » Natural Products Utilization Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #280976

Research Project: Discovery and Development of Natural Product-based Weed Management Methods

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Natural pesticides derived from plants: discovery, uses and perspectives

Author
item Moraes, Rita - University Of Mississippi
item Cerdeira, Antonio - Embprapa
item Duke, Stephen
item Dayan, Franck
item Cantrell, Charles
item Queiroz, Sonia - Embrapa

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/7/2013
Publication Date: 12/12/2016
Citation: Moreas, R.M, A.L. Cerdiera, S.O. Duke, F.E. Dayan, C.L. Cantrell, and S.C.N. Queiroz. 2016. Pesticidas Naturais Derivdos de Plantas: Descoberta et Usos (Natural Pesticides Derived from Plants: Discovery and Uses). In: Halfeld-Vieira, B.A, Marinho-Prado, J.S., Nechet, K.L., Morandi, M.A.B., Bettiol, W., editors. Defensivos Agrícolas Naturais: Uso e Perspectivas (Natural Agricultural Defenses: Use and Perspectives). Jaguariúa, Brazil: Emprapa Meio Ambiente. p. 505-541.

Interpretive Summary: This review discusses the chemical diversity of natural products and the possibility of isolating active compounds for pest management using bioassays. There is currently a demand for more effective and less expensive natural products for pest management. The approval process for natural products as pesticides is relatively fast in the United States, especially if the constituents are known for safety. However, organic farmers seem mostly interested in new products containing essential oils as active ingredients. In addition to the research being conducted in laboratories and greenhouses, to reach farmers, evaluations in the field deserve more attention. Natural products are considered more environmentally friendly and are likely to be accepted by both organic and conventional farmers.

Technical Abstract: This review discusses the chemical diversity of natural products and the possibility of isolating active compounds for pest management using bioassays. There is currently a demand for more effective and less expensive natural products for pest management. The approval process for natural products as pesticides is relatively fast in the United States, especially if the constituents are known for safety. However, organic farmers seem mostly interested in new products containing essential oils as active ingredients. In addition to the research being conducted in laboratories and greenhouses, to reach farmers, evaluations in the field deserve more attention. Natural products are considered more environmentally friendly and are likely to be accepted by both organic and conventional farmers.