Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Safe Management and Use of Manure, Biosolids, and Industrial Byproducts

Location: Genetics and Sustainable Agriculture Research

Title: Use of animal waste and flue gas desulfurized gypsum to improve forage production on reclaimed mine soil in Mississippi)

Author
item Read, John
item Adeli, Ardeshir
item Lang, David

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/23/2012
Publication Date: 7/2/2012
Citation: Read, J.J., Adeli, A., Lang, D.E. 2012. Use of animal waste and flue gas desulfurized gypsum to improve forage production on reclaimed mine soil in Mississippi. Proceedings of American Society of Mining and Reclamation. http://www.asmr.us.Meetings/2012/Abstracts/0453-MS.pdf.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Reclaimed mine soils amended with flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum may tolerate higher levels of animal manure, and would therefore be more productive in the long-term. Studies were conducted in respread soil during the first year of land reclamation at Red Hills Mine, a surface lignite mine in northeast Mississippi, to determine forage grass responses to 896 kg/ha NPK fertilizer as the standard practice, 11.2 Mg/ha FGD gypsum, 22.4 Mg/ha poultry manure (litter); 22.4 Mg/ha composted swine mortalities, NPK fertilizer + gypsum, litter + gypsum, and compost + gypsum. In early May, treatments were applied by hand and incorporated to 15-cm depth using a tandem disc, and seeds were planted using a Brillion cultipaker. Percent plant cover in August was similar among treatments. Based on a single harvest in September, litter + gypsum produced 4.3 Mg biomass per ha, similar to values obtained with litter only (4.2 Mg/ha), NPK fertilizer (3.3 Mg/ha), and NPK fertilizer + gypsum (3.4 Mg/ha). Plant growth was stimulated by amendments that provided N and other nutrients, as gypsum alone resulted in the least biomass of approximately 1.7 Mg ha-1. Similarly, plants were approximately 8 cm taller in the litter than gypsum treatment (25 vs. 17 cm). Growth response to litter appeared to be associated with higher levels of P, K and Na in the 30-cm soil depth, as compared to other amendments.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
Footer Content Back to Top of Page