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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of lipid source and oxidation level on metabolic oxidation status of young pigs)

Author
item Liu, Pai
item Kerr, Brian
item Weber, Thomas
item Chen, Chi
item Johnston, Lee
item Shurson, Gerald

Submitted to: Midwestern Section of the American Society of Animal Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/21/2012
Publication Date: 3/21/2012
Citation: Liu, P., Kerr, B.J., Weber, T.E., Chen, C., Johnston, L., Shurson, G. 2012. Effect of lipid source and oxidation level on metabolic oxidation status of young pigs [abstract]. Midwestern Section of the American Society of Animal Science. Journal of Animal Science 90 (Suppl. 2):75.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: To evaluate the effects of lipid source and oxidation level on metabolic oxidation status of young pigs, 108 barrows (~ 6.66 kg BW) were assigned to 1 of 13 dietary treatments in a 4 × 3 factorial design, including one control diet and 12 diets containing 10% lipid [corn oil (CN), canola oil (CA), poultry fat (PF), and tallow (TL)], with 3 oxidation levels: original lipids (OR), slow oxidation (SO) of lipids heated for 72 h at 95°C, and rapid oxidation of lipids (RO) heated for 7 h at 185°C. Pigs were provided ad libitum access to diets for 28-d, followed by an 8-d limited (4% of 29-d BW) feeding period. On d 38, 24-h fasted serum and urine were collected for vitamin E and TBARS analysis. CA and CN had a higher PUFA and IV than TL (54% and 23% vs. 2% of PUFA, and 121 and 103 vs. 34 IV, respectively), with PF being intermediate (18% of PUFA and 75 IV). SO had increased (P < 0.001) PV than OR in all lipids. Both SO and RO had led to increased greater(P < 0.001) TBARS than OR CA and CN, and also led to generation of HNE in CN (194 and 594 mmol/kg, respectively), CA (105 and 221 mmol/kg, respectively) and TL (13 and 6 mmol/kg, respectively), while only SO caused producing HNE production in PF (2 mmol/kg). A lipid × oxidation interaction (P < 0.01) was observed in serum alpha-tocopherol levels, which was mainly caused by SO or RO significantly decreasing alpha-tocopherol concentration in CA and CN treatments, but not in PF and TL treatments. Pigs fed CA or CN diets had higher (P < 0.05) serum alpha-tocopherol levels than those fed PF. Serum alpha-tocopherol concentration of in pigs fed CN tended to be higher (P = 0.07) than those fed TL. Pigs fed SO or RO had lower (P < 0.05) serum alpha-tocopherol levels than those fed OR. Addition of CN or CA to diets increased (P < 0.05) serum TBARS compared to feeding PF or TL diets, and feeding SO or RO increased (P < 0.05) serum TBARS compared with feeding diets containing OR. No lipid source, oxidation level, or lipid source × oxidation level interaction were observed for urine TBARS. These results indicate that feeding weaning pigs with 10% of thermally oxidized animal fats and vegetable oils for 38 days impairs their oxidative status by reducing serum alpha-tocopherol and increasing serum secondary lipid peroxidation products.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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