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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #272246

Research Project: Mite Systematics and Arthropod Diagnostics with Emphasis on Invasive Species

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: Trachymolgus purpureus sp. nov., an armored snout mite (Acari: Bdellidae) from the Ozark highlands: morphology, development, and key to Trachymolgus Berlese

Author
item Fisher, Ray - University Of Arkansas
item Skvaria, Michael - University Of Arkansas
item Bauchan, Gary
item Ochoa, Ronald - Ron
item Dowling, A.p. - Maryland Department Of Agriculture

Submitted to: ZooKeys
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/9/2011
Publication Date: 9/12/2011
Citation: Fisher, R., Skvaria, M.J., Bauchan, G.R., Ochoa, R., Dowling, A.G. 2011. Trachymolgus purpureus sp. nov., an armored snout mite (Acari: Bdellidae) from the Ozark highlands: morphology, development, and key to Trachymolgus Berlese. ZooKeys. 125:1-34.

Interpretive Summary: There are many unknown predatory mites species associated with pests on crops, ornamentals, fruit and forest trees. Around 100 species of soft bodied predatory mites have been described from soil habitats. These predatory mites are small with strange body shapes, and a wide variety of body colors. Their biology and distribution is poorly known. This paper describes and illustrates a new species of a predatory mite from Arkansas. This paper is of interest to biologists, entomologists, zoologists and students involved in studies of nature, systematics and soil biology.

Technical Abstract: Trachymolgus purpureus Fisher & Dowling sp. nov. is described from the Ozark highlands of North America. A diversity of imaging techniques are used to illustrate the species including field emission low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (FE-LTSEM), stereomicrography, compound light micrography, and digitally created line drawings. Developmental stages (larva, nymphs, and adult) and morphology are illustrated and discussed, and terminological corrections are suggested. Trachymolgus recki Gomelauri, 1961 is regarded as being described from tritonymphs. A key to Trachymolgus is presented.