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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Management Practices to Mitigate Global Climate Change, Enhance Bio-Energy Production, Increase Soil-C Stocks & Sustain Soil Productivity...

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Title: Co-adaptationary aspects of the underground communication between plants and other organisms)

Author
item Sugiyama, Akifuma
item Manter, Daniel
item Vivanco, Jorge

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/19/2011
Publication Date: 1/20/2012
Citation: Sugiyama, A., Manter, D.K., Vivanco, J. 2012. Co-adaptationary Aspects of the Underground Communication Between Plants and Other Organisms. In: Witzany, G. editor. Biocommunication of Plants. G. Witzany (ed). Springer, NY. pp. 361-376.

Interpretive Summary: Soil microbial communities are comprised of a vast array of bacteria, fungi, nematodes and other organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that these communities are not passively determined but actively regulated by plants. This chapter discusses the role plant root exudates play in the active regulation of soil microbial communities. In addition we discuss the potential role co-adapted plant-soil microbial communities may play in agricultural sustainability and production. We suggest that minimal disruption in the plant-microbial community should be maintained in order to achieve maximum long-term agricultural production by minimizing disease outbreaks and by reducing costly agricultural inputs such as pesticides and fertilizers.

Technical Abstract: Soil microbial communities are comprised of a vast array of bacteria, fungi, nematodes and other organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that these communities are not passively determined but actively regulated by plants. This chapter discusses the role plant root exudates play in the active regulation of soil microbial communities. In addition we discuss the potential role co-adapted plant-soil microbial communities may play in agricultural sustainability and production. We suggest that minimal disruption in the plant-microbial community should be maintained in order to achieve maximum long-term agricultural production by minimizing disease outbreaks and by reducing costly agricultural inputs such as pesticides and fertilizers.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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