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ARS Home » Plains Area » Clay Center, Nebraska » U.S. Meat Animal Research Center » Meat Safety & Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #270797

Title: Sire breed effect on beef longissimus mineral concentrations and their relationships with carcass and palatability traits

Author
item Duan, Q - Iowa State University
item Tait, Jr., R - Iowa State University
item Schneider, M - Iowa State University
item Beitz, D - Iowa State University
item Wheeler, Tommy
item Shackelford, Steven
item Cundiff, Larry
item Reecy, J - Iowa State University

Submitted to: Meat Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/20/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/60651
Citation: Duan, Q., Tait, Jr., R.G., Schneider, M.J., Beitz, D.C., Wheeler, T.L., Shackelford, S.D., Cundiff, L.V., Reecy, J.M. 2015. Sire breed effect on beef longissimus mineral concentrations and their relationships with carcass and palatability traits. Meat Science. 106:25-30.

Interpretive Summary: Beef is a good source of dietary iron, zinc, and magnesium. But few studies have evaluated whether the meat from different breeds of cattle differ in mineral concentrations. In addition, little information is available in regard to the correlation between beef mineral concentrations and carcass traits and eating quality. Understanding of the relationship between minerals and other traits in beef would be valuable for selective breeding to improve the healthfulness of beef. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cattle breed on iron, zinc, and magnesium concentration in beef ribeye steaks and to determine the relationship between beef nutrient composition and carcass traits and eating quality. The results indicate breed did not affect iron, zinc, or magnesium levels. Carcass traits and eating quality were not related to iron or zinc, whereas magnesium concentration was correlated with all the carcass traits and eating quality traits. This study may be useful in selective breeding to improve carcass, beef nutrient composition, or eating quality traits.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sire breed on iron, zinc, and magnesium concentration in bovine longissimus muscle (LM) and to investigate the correlation between beef nutrient composition and carcass traits and palatability. Steer progeny resulted from artificial insemination mating of Angus and MARC III females with Hereford, Angus, Brangus, Beefmaster, Bonsmara, and Romosinuano males. LM samples were collected and used to determine the chemical composition, Warner-Bratzler shear force as well as sensory traits. A mixed linear model was used to evaluate breed effect. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the linear relationships between mineral concentration and carcass and sensory traits. No significant (P > 0.05) sire or dam breed effect was observed for iron, zinc, and magnesium after controlling for animal age, intramuscular fat, and final body weight. Zinc concentration was positively correlated (P < 0.05) with that of iron and magnesium. No significant (P > 0.05) correlation was found for carcass traits or palatability and iron or zinc whereas magnesium concentration was correlated with all the carcass traits and sensory traits analyzed in this study. In conclusion, breed had no effect on the variation of iron, zinc, and magnesium concentration. Correlations were observed for beef minerals and carcass and sensory traits. Information provided by this study may be useful in selective breeding to improve carcass, beef nutrient composition, or sensory attributes.