Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Self-perceived lactose intolerance results in lower intakes of calcium and dairy foods and is associated with hypertension and diabetes in adults)

Author
item Nicklas, Theresa
item Haiyan, Qu
item Hughes, Sheryl
item He, Mengying
item Wagner, Sara
item Foushee, Herman
item Shewchuk, Richard

Submitted to: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/7/2011
Publication Date: 7/1/2011
Citation: Nicklas, T.A., Haiyan, Q., Hughes, S.O., He, M., Wagner, S.E., Foushee, H.R., Shewchuk, R.M. 2011. Self-perceived lactose intolerance results in lower intakes of calcium and dairy foods and is associated with hypertension and diabetes in adults. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 94(1):191-198.

Interpretive Summary: Self-perceived lactose intolerance may result in problematic dietary intake. More studies are needed to understand how common self-perceived lactose intolerance is and how it relates to calcium intake and high blood pressure and diabetes. The objective of this study was to examine how self-perceived lactose intolerance impacts the intake of calcium in a nationally representative sample of White, Black, and Hispanic adults. The prevalence of self-perceived lactose intolerance was 7.8% for whites, 20.1% for blacks, and 8.8% for Hispanics. On average, people with self-perceived lactose intolerance consumed significantly less calcium from dairy foods than did people without self-perceived lactose intolerance. Self-perceived lactose-intolerant respondents had a significantly lower calcium intake from dairy foods and reported having a significantly higher rates of diabetes and hypertension.

Technical Abstract: Self-perceived lactose intolerance may result in adverse dietary modifications; thus, more studies are needed to understand the prevalence of self-perceived lactose intolerance and how it relates to calcium intake and selected health conditions. The objective was to examine the effects of self-perceived lactose intolerance as it relates to calcium intake and specific health problems that have been attributed to reduced intakes of calcium and dairy foods in a nationally representative multiethnic sample of adults. This was a cross-sectional study in a national sample of 3452 adults. The relation between self-perceived lactose intolerance, calcium intakes, and physician-diagnosed health conditions was analyzed by using linear regression analyses. Of the total sample, 12.3% of respondents perceived themselves to be lactose intolerant. The age-adjusted prevalence of self-perceived lactose intolerance was 7.8% for non-Hispanic whites, 20.1% for non-Hispanic blacks, and 8.8% for Hispanics. Respondents with self-perceived lactose intolerance had significantly lower (P less than 0.05) average daily calcium intakes from dairy foods than did those without self-perceived lactose intolerance. A significantly higher (P less than 0.05) percentage of respondents with self-perceived lactose intolerance than of respondents without self-perceived lactose intolerance reported having physician-diagnosed diabetes and hypertension. The odds of self-reported physician-diagnosed diabetes or hypertension decreased by factors of 0.70 and 0.60, respectively, for a 1000-mg increase in calcium intake from dairy foods per day. In conclusion, self-perceived lactose-intolerant respondents had a significantly lower calcium intake from dairy foods and reported having a significantly higher rate of physician-diagnosed diabetes and hypertension.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
Footer Content Back to Top of Page