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Research Project: BIOCONTROL OF INVASIVE PESTS SUCH AS EMERALD ASH BORER AND QUARANTINE SERVICES

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Release and recovery of parasitiods of the emerlad ash borer agrilus planipennis in Michigan, Ohio and Maryland

Author
item Bauer, Leah - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Gould, Juli - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Duan, Jian
item Fraser, Ivich - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Hansen, Jason - Michigan State University
item Ulyshen, Michael - Michigan State University
item Lelito, Jonathan - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)

Submitted to: USDA Interagency Research Forum on Invasive Species
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/30/2011
Publication Date: 1/13/2012
Citation: Bauer, L., Gould, J., Duan, J.J., Fraser, I., Hansen, J., Ulyshen, M., Lelito, J. 2012. Release and recovery of parasitiods of the emerlad ash borer agrilus planipennis in Michigan, Ohio and Maryland. USDA Interagency Research Forum on Invasive Species. p. 14; p. 24; p. 70.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Three hymenotperan parasitoid species were introduced to the United State from China for biological control of emerald ash borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis in 2007. These species are Tetrastichus planipennisi (Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endoparasitoid; Oobius agrili (Encyrtidae), a solitary parthenogenic egg parasitoid, and Spathius agrili (Braconidae), a gregarious larval ectoparasitoid. After federal and state approval, these parasitoids were released in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Maryland in 2007, 2008 and/or 2009. Field sampling in 2009 and 2010 indicated that all three species have been successfully recovered in Maryland, Ohio and Maryland. These parasitoids are difficult to recover from field sites, although release of greater parasitoid numbers throughout the field season increases their probability of establishment and our ability to detect them. Recovery methods such as yellow pan traps, sentinel logs, or pheromones are easier to deploy, and, if more effective in recovering parasitoids, will become increasingly important as the number of ash trees available for sampling declines. Future releases will be made at locations where EAB population density is low, and monitoring of ash health will continue.