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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Sunflower and Plant Biology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #264445

Title: Breeding and quantitative genetics advances in sunflower Sclerotinia research

Author
item Talukder, Zahirul - North Dakota State University
item Hulke, Brent
item Qi, Lili
item Gulya Jr, Thomas

Submitted to: World Wide Web
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/5/2011
Publication Date: 2/5/2011
Citation: Talukder, Z., Hulke, B.S., Qi, L., Gulya, T.J. 2011. Breeding and quantitative genetics advances in sunflower Sclerotinia research. Presentation at the National Sunflower Association Research Forum, January 12-13, 2011, Fargo, ND. Available: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/research-forum-presentations/2011/

Interpretive Summary: Genetic research of the sunflower research unit, USDA-ARS, in Fargo, ND, was discussed in a presentation to a group of producers, industry representatives, and scientists. The need for sunflower quantitative genetics research to find and capture Sclerotinia resistance is increasing with every year that this disease results in widespread losses in yield and crop quality. We outlined how we are trying to increase resistance in cultivated sunflower using current molecular genetics techniques combined with current plant breeding methods.

Technical Abstract: Genetic research of the sunflower research unit, USDA-ARS, in Fargo, ND, was discussed in a presentation to a group of producers, industry representatives, and scientists. The need for sunflower quantitative genetics research to find and capture Sclerotinia resistance is increasing with every year that this disease results in widespread losses in yield and crop quality. Two methods are being used: backcrossing to introduce newly discovered QTL for resistance into a confectionery and oilseed genetic background, and the use of association mapping with both a candidate gene approach and a genomewide approach to find additional QTL in a panel of 260 diverse, domesticated lines from the Plant Introduction station in Ames, IA [Sclerotinia Initiative funded this research].