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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: OBJECT MODELING AND SCALING OF LANDSCAPE PROCESSES AND CONSERVATION EFFECTS IN AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS

Location: Agricultural Systems Research

Title: Crop development related to temperature and photoperiod in temperate cereals)

Author
item Moragues, Marc
item Mcmaster, Gregory - Greg

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/19/2011
Publication Date: 2/19/2013
Citation: Moragues, M., Mcmaster, G.S. 2013. Crop development related to temperature and photoperiod in temperate cereals. In: Meyers, R.A. Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology. Vol. C., Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag. p. 2540-2558. Available: http://www.springerreference.com/docs/html/chapterbid/226420.html.

Interpretive Summary: Plant development, or the progression of plants through their life cycle, has been of great interest in human history because of the need to know and predict when the harvested part of the plant was at the optimum stage. This knowledge was especially important (even vital) in medicinal plants, where the timing of harvesting defines the medicinal value of the product. This interest increased as groups moved from hunting and gathering to agrarian societies. Crop development can be defined with the number and rate of appearance, growth and senescence of phytomers. However, that definition lacks information about when the switch of vegetative to reproductive phytomers occurs, which is defined by the phenology of the crop. Crop development is of great importance in agriculture because it is the main mechanism plants use to escape both biotic and abiotic stresses, and adapt to the environment. At a more practical level, it affects the management of the crop because cultural practices are more effective at specific stages of crop development. This paper discusses crop development and phenology with the emphasis on temperate cereals.

Technical Abstract: Plant development, or the progression of plants through their life cycle, has been of great interest in human history because of the need to know and predict when the harvested part of the plant was at the optimum stage. This knowledge was especially important (even vital) in medicinal plants, where the timing of harvesting defines the medicinal value of the product. This interest increased as groups moved from hunting and gathering to agrarian societies. Crop development can be defined with the number and rate of appearance, growth and senescence of phytomers. However, that definition lacks information about when the switch of vegetative to reproductive phytomers occurs, which is defined by the phenology of the crop. Crop development is of great importance in agriculture because it is the main mechanism plants use to escape both biotic and abiotic stresses, and adapt to the environment. At a more practical level, it affects the management of the crop because cultural practices are more effective at specific stages of crop development. This paper discusses crop development and phenology with the emphasis on temperate cereals.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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