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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #253383

Title: Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

Author
item Shih, Chun-kuang - Taipei Medical University
item Chen, Chiao-ming - Shih Chien University
item Liu, Jen-fang - Taipei Medical University
item Chen, C-y Oliver - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Lin, Hui-wen - Taipei Medical University
item Chou, Hung-tsung - Taipei Medical University
item Li, Sing-chung - Taipei Medical University

Submitted to: Food and Chemical Toxicology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/2/2010
Publication Date: 7/20/2010
Citation: Shih, C., Chen, C., Liu, J., Chen, C., Lin, H., Chou, H., Li, S. 2010. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25. Food and Chemical Toxicology. 48:1913-1918.

Interpretive Summary: Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth, and development. The literature has shown that riboflavin might be protective against sepsis induced death. In this study, we examined the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice undergoing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced shock. We found that vitamin B2 (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg BW) administered intraperitoneally before the LPS induced shock improved the survival rate in a dose dependent manner. We also found that HSP25 expressions in the heart and lung were significantly enhanced in a time dependent manner in the vitamin B2 treated mice as compared to the control mice. The results showed that riboflavin could decrease LPS-induced mortality through an increased expression of HSP25.

Technical Abstract: Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice undergoing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced shock. Mice were assigned to four groups, saline vehicle, LPS, LPS plus low dose of vitamin B2 (LB2) and LPS plus high dose of vitamin B2 (HB2). Vitamin B2 (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg BW) was administered intraperitoneally at 2 and 0 hr before the i.p. administration of LPS. At the end of the experiment, the survival rate monitored was 10, 20, 60, and 100% for LPS, LB2, HB2, and saline mice, respectively. HSP25 expressions in the heart and lung were significantly enhanced in a time dependent manner in the HB2 mice as compared to the saline mice (p <0.05), but not altered in the LB2 mice. In the HB2 mice, plasma riboflavin concentrations reached 300 nM at 6 h post LPS and returned to the 0 h level at 72 h. The results showed that high dose of riboflavin could decrease LPS-induced mortality through an increased expression of HSP25.