Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of non-protein nitrogen and wet distiller's grains with solubles on growth performance, carcass merit, mineral status, tissue enzyme activities, and visceral organ mass by feedlot cattle)

Author
item Ponce, Christian
item Brown, Mike
item Osterstock, Jason
item Cole, Noel - Andy
item Lawrence, Ty
item Macdonald, Jim
item Maxwell, Casey
item Wallace, J
item Coufal, Bill

Submitted to: Proceeding of Plains Nutrition Council Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/10/2010
Publication Date: 4/22/2010
Citation: Ponce, C., Brown, M., Osterstock, J., Cole, N.A., Lawrence, T., Macdonald, J., Maxwell, C., Wallace, J., Coufal, B. 2010. Effects of non-protein nitrogen and wet distiller's grains with solubles on growth performance, carcass merit, mineral status, tissue enzyme activities, and visceral organ mass by feedlot cattle [abstract]. In: Proceeding of Plains Nutrition Council Spring Conference, April 22-23, 2010, San Antonio, Texas. Pub No. AREC 10-57, p. 114.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Our previous data suggest that the non-protein nitrogen (NPN) need in diets with 15% wet distiller's grains with solubles (WDGS) for optimum growth performance may be slightly less than in 0% WDGS diets and a potential for reduced dressed yield with higher levels of WDGS. In Exp. 1, steer calves (n = 296; initial BW = 759 lb) were adapted to a common finishing diet, blocked by BW, and assigned to 36 soil-surfaced pens (18 m**2 of pen space and 33 cm of bunk space/animal). Treatments included a control diet without WDGS (contained 3% NPN from urea, and cottonseed meal) and 15% WDGS with either 1.5, 2.25, or 3.0% NPN (0.52, 0.78, and 1.06% urea, respectively). The WDGS was obtained three times/week and averaged 75:25 corn:sorghum over the study. Steers were implanted on d 1 with Revalor-XS and were fed twice daily for an average of 165 d. Overall DMI was 6.1% higher (P = 0.001) for steers receiving WDGS than for the control. Similarly, steers fed WDGS had 8% greater ADG (P < 0.01) on either a live or a carcass-adjusted basis than the control. However, overall gain efficiency on either a live or adjusted basis was not different among treatments (P > 0.15). Dietary NPN did not influence growth performance by cattle fed WDGS (P > 0.21). Hot carcass weight was 3% lighter for the control than for the average of WDGS (P = 0.01). Remaining measured carcass characteristics were not altered by treatment (P > 0.16). In Experiment 2, 24 steers (initial BW = 847 lb) were blocked by weight, randomly assigned to dietary treatments (0, 30, and 60% of DM as WDGS), and were fed individually for 125, 150 164 and 192 d (2 blocks/slaughter date). Steers fed 30% WDGS had greater liver S and Mn concentrations and lower liver Fe concentrations than the control (P < 0.10; initial values used as a covariate). However, feeding 60% WDGS decreased liver Cu and increased liver Fe (P < 0.10) compared to those fed 30% WDGS. Cytochrome c oxidase activity in brain tissue was decreased when feeding 60% WDGS compared to 30% WDGS (P = 0.10), and cytochrome c oxidase activity decreased linearly (P = 0.06) in lung tissue as WDGS increased. Feeding WDGS increased gut fill in a linear manner (P = 0.01). Feeding 30% WDGS increased fractional mass (g/kg of EBW) of the small intestine (P < 0.10) compared to the control, whereas 60% WDGS increased fractional kidney mass (P < 0.10) compared to those fed 30% WDGS. Data suggest that growth performance may not be improved by including more than 1.5% added NPN in diets with 15% WDGS. Dressed yield, Cu absorption or retention, and cytochrome c oxidase activity may be reduced by WDGS when fed at higher levels in diets based on steam-flaked corn.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
Footer Content Back to Top of Page