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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Geographic information systems in corn rootworm management)

Author
item French, Bryan - Wade
item Reitsma, Kurtis
item Beckler, Amber
item Chandler, Laurence - Larry
item Clay, Sharon

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/24/2010
Publication Date: 2/15/2011
Citation: French, B.W., Reitsma, K.D., Beckler, A.A., Chandler, L.D., Clay, S.A. 2011. Geographic information systems in corn rootworm management. In: GIS Applications in Agriculture, Volume Three: Invasive Species. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. p. 233-253.

Interpretive Summary: Corn rootworms are serious pests of corn in the United States and Europe. Control measures for corn rootworms (CRW) were historically based upon chemical pesticides and crop rotation. Pesticide use created environmental and economic concerns. In 1997, a five year areawide CRW management program was established in five states to manage CRW populations on a multi-field scale to help producers better manage these pests. Spatial data was used to predict areas of infestation, leading to more site-specific management techniques. The goal was to more fully understand the spatial relationships among CRW infestations and physical features of the landscape. Geographical information systems (GIS) and spatial analytical techniques were used to examine relationships among CRW populations and soil texture. This chapter uses adult CRW data collected in 1998 from cornfields within a 41,400 ha study area in Brookings, County in eastern South Dakota. We demonstrate the procedures and techniques used to examine CRW populations and soil texture relationships. Procedures and techniques demonstrated in this chapter include interpolation, spatial autocorrelation, and comparative analysis.

Technical Abstract: Corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp. Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are serious pests of corn (Zea mays) in the United States and Europe. Control measures for corn rootworms (CRW) were historically based upon chemical pesticides and crop rotation. Pesticide use created environmental and economic concerns. In 1997, a five year areawide CRW management program was established in five states to manage CRW populations on a multi-field scale to help producers better manage these pests. Spatial data was used to predict areas of infestation, leading to more site-specific management techniques. The goal was to more fully understand the spatial relationships among CRW infestations and physical features of the landscape. Geographical information systems (GIS) and spatial analytical techniques were used to examine relationships among CRW populations and soil texture. This chapter uses CRW (adult) data collected in 1998 from cornfields within a 41,400 ha study area in Brookings, County in eastern South Dakota to demonstrate the procedures and techniques used to examine CRW populations and soil texture relationships. Procedures and techniques demonstrated in this chapter include interpolation, spatial autocorrelation, and comparative analysis.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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