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Title: Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture

Author
item Hill, R - University Of Idaho
item Connor, Erin
item Poulos, S - Coca-Cola Company
item Welsh, T - Texas Agrilife
item Gabler, N - Iowa State University

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/11/2010
Publication Date: 4/6/2010
Publication URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/42533
Citation: Hill, R.A., Connor, E.E., Poulos, S.P., Welsh, T.H., Gabler, N.K. 2010. Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture. Journal of Animal Science. 88:E38-39.

Interpretive Summary: Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by changing the environment of the dam during pregnancy and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held summarizing our current knowledge of fetal programming in animal production. This is an introduction to the symposium papers published from the Growth and Development Symposium titled “Fetal Programming in Animal Agriculture” held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, the Canadian Society of Animal Science, and the American Society of Animal Science in Montreal, Quebec, Canada July 12 to 16, 2009.

Technical Abstract: Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by altering the maternal environment and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held to provide an overview of current knowledge of fetal programming in relation to the animal sciences. Particular emphasis was placed on muscle tissue, milk supply, and reproduction across agriculturally-important species. This is an introduction to the symposium papers published from the Growth and Development Symposium titled “Fetal Programming in Animal Agriculture” held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, the Canadian Society of Animal Science, and the American Society of Animal Science in Montreal, Quebec, Canada July 12 to 16, 2009.