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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Community-based strength training improves physical function in older women and arthritis)

Author
item Layne, Jennifer
item Arabelovic, Senada
item Wilson, Lynn Barios
item Cloutier, Gregory
item Pindrus, Mariya
item Mallio, Charlotte
item Roubenoff, Ronen
item Castaneda-sceppa, Carmen

Submitted to: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/20/2009
Publication Date: 11/1/2009
Citation: Layne, J.E., Arabelovic, S., Wilson, L., Cloutier, G.J., Pindrus, M.A., Mallio, C.J., Roubenoff, R., Castaneda-Sceppa, C. 2009. Community-based strength training improves physical function in older women and arthritis. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 3(6):466-473.

Interpretive Summary: Exercise is recognized as a mainstay treatment of arthritis, yet more than 40% of adults with arthritis report that they do not dedicate leisure time to physical activity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to identify and promote evidence-based physical activity programs to improve physical function among adults with arthritis. The authors of this paper conducted a mul¬tisite, pilot randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of community-based strength training versus usual activity in women 55 years of age and older with arthritis. The moderate-intensity, progressive strength training intervention included balance and flexibility exercises. Classes met 2 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included muscle strength, performance-based physical function (mobility, flexibility, and balance), and arthritis symptoms. The study found that there were no adverse effects on arthri¬tis symptoms. These results demon¬strate the efficacy of this program and its potential to be disseminated as an evidence-based strength training inter¬vention to improve physical function and strength among older women with arthritis and other major comorbidities.

Technical Abstract: Exercise is recognized as a mainstay treatment of arthritis, yet more than 40% of adults with arthritis report no leisure time physical activity participation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to identify and promote evidence-based physical activity programs to improve physical function among adults with arthritis. The authors conducted a mul¬tisite, pilot randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of community-based strength training versus usual activity in women (n = 33) 55 years of age and older with arthritis. The moderate-intensity, progressive strength training intervention included balance and flexibility exercises. Classes met 2 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included muscle strength, performance-based physical function (mobility, flexibility, and balance), and arthritis symptoms. Lower body strength improved from baseline to 12 weeks in the strength training versus con¬trol group (32.2%-7.3%, respectively; P = .004). Physical function improved in the strength training group over 12 weeks (range, 7%-50%; P < .05), with no change in control group. Adherence to the intervention was 82% ± 16%. There were no adverse effects on arthri¬tis symptoms. These results demon¬strate the efficacy of this program and its potential to be disseminated as an evidence-based strength training inter¬vention to improve physical function and strength among older women with arthritis and other major comorbidities.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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