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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Poplarville, Mississippi » Southern Horticultural Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #247261

Title: Rooting Rose Cuttings in Whole Pine Tree Substrates

Author
item Witcher, Anthony
item Blythe, Eugene - Mississippi State Extension Service
item Fain, Glen - Auburn University
item Curry, Kenneth - University Of Southern Mississippi
item Spiers, James

Submitted to: International Plant Propagators Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/13/2010
Publication Date: 8/1/2011
Citation: Witcher, A.L., Blythe, E.K., Fain, G.B., Curry, K.J., Spiers, J.M. 2011. Rooting Rose Cuttings in Whole Pine Tree Substrates. International Plant Propagators Proceedings. 60:277-279.

Interpretive Summary: Wood-based substrates, such as processed whole pine trees (WPT), have been identified as substitutes for pine bark (PB) and peat moss (P) in container production of ornamental crops. Limited information is available on how WPT may perform as a rooting substrate for cutting propagation. Four substrates [WPT, WPT:P (1:1), PB, and PB:P (1:1)] were used to evaluate root development of single-node cuttings of Rosa ‘Red Cascade’. Cuttings rooted in WPT had the least total root length and total root volume, while cuttings rooted in PB:P exhibited the greatest total root length and total root volume. The addition of peat resulted in increased root development for WPT and PB, so substrate physical properties may have a greater effect on root development compared to substrate chemical properties. Future analysis of substrate physical properties, together with substrate bioassays, will assist in the development of protocols for enhancing root development in WPT substrates. Demonstrating the versatility of WPT substrates is essential to expanding their commercial use and availability.

Technical Abstract: Increased demand for alternatives to pine bark (PB) and peat moss (P) has led to extensive research on wood-based substrates, such as processed whole pine trees (WPT), for nursery and greenhouse crop production. Limited information is available on how WPT may perform as a rooting substrate for cutting propagation. Four substrates [WPT, WPT:P (1:1), PB, and PB:P (1:1)] were used to evaluate root development of single-node cuttings of Rosa ‘Red Cascade’. Cuttings rooted in WPT had the least total root length and total root volume, while cuttings rooted in PB:P exhibited the greatest total root length and total root volume. The addition of peat resulted in increased root development for WPT and PB, so substrate physical properties may have a greater effect on root development compared to substrate chemical properties. Future analysis of substrate physical properties, together with substrate bioassays, will assist in the development of protocols for enhancing root development in WPT substrates.