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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Stabilizing Smoked Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) Tissue after Extraction of Oil)

Author
item Bower, Cynthia
item Hietala, Katie

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/11/2009
Publication Date: 4/20/2010
Citation: Bower, C.K., Hietala, K.A. 2010. Stabilizing Smoked Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) Tissue after Extraction of Oil. Journal of Food Science. 75(3):C241-C245.

Interpretive Summary: Alaska salmon oils are rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and are prized by the food and pharmaceutical industries. However, the tissue that remains after oil extraction does not have an established market. Discarded salmon tissues were preserved using a combination of smoke-processing and acidification with lactic acid bacteria (LAB). All samples were analyzed for moisture, protein, ash, and lipid composition. Bacterial cell counts, pH and lactic acid concentrations were recorded as a measure of LAB viability. Neither raw nor smoked salmon were free from spoilage, whereas samples both smoked and fermented were successfully stabilized below pH 4.7 during 60 days of storage.

Technical Abstract: Alaska salmon oils are rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and are prized by the food and pharmaceutical industries. However, the tissue that remains after oil extraction does not have an established market. Discarded salmon tissues were preserved using a combination of smoke-processing and acidification with lactic acid bacteria (LAB). All samples were analyzed for moisture, protein, ash, and lipid composition. Bacterial cell counts, pH and lactic acid concentrations were recorded as a measure of LAB viability. Neither raw nor smoked salmon were free from spoilage, whereas samples both smoked and fermented were successfully stabilized below pH 4.7 during 60 days of storage.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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