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Title: Expressed sequence tags from a SSH cDNA library identified genes involved in adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in ‘Xingzi 9104’ wheat

Author
item HUANG, XUELING - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item MA, JINBIAO - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item Chen, Xianming
item WANG, XIAOJIE - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item DING, KE - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item HAN, DEJUN - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item QU, ZHIPENG - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item HUANG, L - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University
item KANG, ZHENXHENG - Northwest Agriculture And Forestry University

Submitted to: Biomed Central (BMC) Plant Biology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/18/2012
Publication Date: 11/1/2012
Citation: Huang, X., Ma, J., Chen, X., Wang, X., Ding, K., Han, D., Qu, Z., Huang, L.L., Kang, Z. 2012. Expressed sequence tags from a SSH cDNA library identified genes involved in adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in ‘Xingzi 9104’ wheat. Biomed Central (BMC) Plant Biology. 81:26-32.

Interpretive Summary: Stripe rust is a destructive disease of wheat worldwide. Adult-plant resistance (APR) is mostly durable. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of APR, the suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach was used to identify wheat genes induced by the stripe rust pathogen inoculation at adult-plant stage. A total of 1,250 positive cDNA clones were obtained and sequenced, from which, 427 unique sequences were obtained and compared to the GenBank database. The sequences were categorized as putative genes belonging to virous biochemical processes . Based on the putative functions of the induced genes, we characterized the defense response that is triggered during expression of APR. The results of time-course expression experiemnets confirmed the induction of seven selected genes by the pathogen infection and determined their expression patterns in adult plants and seedlings. The expression levels of all seven genes increased as the plant grew older. The results should be useful for understanding molecular basis of adult-plant resistance in wheat against the stripe rust pathogen.

Technical Abstract: Background: Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Adult-plant resistance (APR) is mostly durable. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of APR, the suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach was used to identify wheat genes induced by Pst inoculation at adult-plant stage. Results: A total of 1,250 positive cDNA clones were obtained and sequenced. After contig analysis with the Cap3 assembler, 427 unique sequences were obtained and compared to the NCBI no-redundant protein database using the BlastX program. The sequences were categorized as putative genes belonging to signal transduction, transcription regulation, protein synthesis and storage, membrane transport, and cell growth and division. Based on the putative functions of the induced genes, we characterized the defense response that is triggered during expression of APR. The time-course expressions using quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the induction of seven selected genes by Pst infection and determined their expression patterns in adult plants and seedlings. The expression levels of all seven ESTs in the mock-inoculated plants,increased as the plant grew older. It is tempting to speculate that there is some preformed resistance in the adult plants of XZ compared to the seedlings. Conclusions: Using the SSH method we obtained the ESTs of genes enriched in a Pst inoculated wheat cultivar with APR. We observed that the initial expression level of these genes increased when the plant grew older. In this study, we also described the time-course expressions of two genes after the challenge of Pst and speculated their possible functions during the interaction of wheat and the stripe rust pathogen.