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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Viral Booster Vaccines Improve Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Induced Protection Against Bovine Tuberculosis)

Author
item Vordermeier, H
item Villarreal-ramos, Bernardo
item Cockle, Paul
item Macaulay, Martin
item Rhodes, Shelley
item Thacker, Tyler
item Gilbert, Sarah
item Mcshane, Helen
item Hill, Adrian
item Xing, R
item Hewinson, R

Submitted to: Infection and Immunity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/21/2009
Publication Date: 8/1/2009
Publication URL: //iai.asm.org/cgi/reprint/IAI.00287-09v1?view=long&pmid=19487476
Citation: Vordermeier, H.M., Villarreal-Ramos, B., Cockle, P.J., Macaulay, M., Rhodes, S.G., Thacker, T.C., Gilbert, S.C., Mcshane, H., Hill, A.V., Xing, R.Z., Hewinson, R.G. 2009. Viral Booster Vaccines Improve Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Induced Protection Against Bovine Tuberculosis. Infection and Immunity. 77(8):3364-3373.

Interpretive Summary: Despite an aggressive eradication program in the United States, bovine Tuberculosis continues to be a threat to animal health. Improved prevention strategies are need in cattle. Development of vaccines that are effective at preventing disease may provide an additional tool to aid the eradiation effort. This study provides the first evidence of improved protection against tuberculosis by viral booster vaccination.

Technical Abstract: Previous work in small animal laboratory models of tuberculosis have shown that vaccination strategies based on heterologous prime-boost protocols using Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) to prime and Modified Vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA85A) or recombinant attenuated adenoviruses (Ad85A) expressing the mycobacterial antigen Ag85A to boost may increase the protective efficacy of BCG. Here we report the first efficacy data using these vaccines in cattle, a natural target species of tuberculous infection. Either Ad85A or MVA85A boosting resulted in protection superior to BCG alone. Analysis of vaccine-induced immunity identified memory responses measured by cultured ELISPOT as well as in vitro IL-17 production as predictors of vaccination success. In summary, this study provides the first evidence of improved protection against tuberculosis by viral booster vaccination in a natural target species, and has prioritised potential correlates of vaccine efficacy for further evaluation. These findings also have implications for human TB vaccine development.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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