Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Burns, Oregon » Range and Meadow Forage Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #240125

Title: Revegetation Guidelines for the Great Basin: Considering Invasive Weeds

Author
item Sheley, Roger
item Mangold, Jane - Montana State University
item Goodwin, K - Montana State University
item Marks, J - Montana State University

Submitted to: Agricultural Research Service Publication
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/1/2008
Publication Date: 1/1/2008
Publication URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/26761
Citation: Sheley, R.L., Mangold, J., Goodwin, K., Marks, J. 2008. Revegetation Guidelines for the Great Basin: Considering Invasive Weeds. Agricultural Research Service Publication. ARS-168

Interpretive Summary: Large portions of the Great Basin become degraded and disturbed every day due to natural and human-induced causes. Some disturbed areas may recover naturally in time, but other areas may never recover naturally because invasive weeds establish quickly and prevent native plants from establishing. Invasive weeds can potentially spread into adjacent, healthy landscapes where they can threaten local biodiversity, alter nutrient and water cycling, diminish wildlife and livestock forage, and increase soil erosion and stream sedimentation. This publication provides an indepth, step-by-step guide to the processes and procedures of establishing desired plant species in the Great Basin ecosystem.

Technical Abstract: Large portions of the Great Basin become degraded and disturbed every day due to natural and human-induced causes. Some disturbed areas may recover naturally in time, but other areas may never recover naturally because invasive weeds establish quickly and prevent native plants from establishing. Invasive weeds can potentially spread into adjacent, healthy landscapes where they can threaten local biodiversity, alter nutrient and water cycling, diminish wildlife and livestock forage, and increase soil erosion and stream sedimentation. This publication provides an indepth, step-by-step guide to the processes and procedures of establishing desired plant species in the Great Basin ecosystem.