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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Recommendation for Naming Transcription Factor Proteins in the Grasses)

Author
item Gray, John
item Bevan, Michael
item Brutnell, Thomas
item Buell, C. robin
item Cone, Karen
item Hake, Sarah
item Jackson, David
item Kellogg, Elizabeth
item Lawrence, Carolyn
item Mccouch, Susan
item Mockler, Todd
item Moose, Stephen
item Paterson, Andrew
item Peterson, Thomas
item Rokshar, Daniel
item Souza, Glaucia mendes
item Springer, Nathan
item Stein, Nils
item Timmermans, Marja
item Wang, Guo-liang
item Grotewold, Erich

Submitted to: Plant Physiology
Publication Type: Peer reviewed journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/1/2008
Publication Date: 1/1/2009
Publication URL: www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/reprint/149/1/4?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&author1=Hake&fulltext=Sarah&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT
Citation: Gray, J., Bevan, M., Brutnell, T., Buell, C., Cone, K., Hake, S.C., Jackson, D., Kellogg, E., Lawrence, C.J., Mccouch, S., Mockler, T., Moose, S., Paterson, A., Peterson, T., Rokshar, D., Souza, G., Springer, N., Stein, N., Timmermans, M., Wang, G., Grotewold, E. 2009. A Recommendation for Naming Transcription Factor Proteins in the Grasses. Plant Physiology. 149(1):4-6.

Interpretive Summary: Transcription factors are central for the exquisite temporal and spatial expression patterns of many genes. These proteins are characterized by their ability to be tethered to particular regulatory sequences in the genes that they control. While many other proteins participate in the regulation of gene expression, we limit our definition of transcription factors here to proteins that often contain a characteristic structural motif, the DNA-binding domain, which is involved in recognizing a short (usually 4–8 bp) DNA sequence. Based on the structure of the DNA-binding domain, transcription factors are classified into 50 to 60 different families, and in plants, 5% to 7% of all the protein-encoding genes are transcription factors, making them, collectively, perhaps the largest functional class of proteins.

Technical Abstract: Transcription factors are central for the exquisite temporal and spatial expression patterns of many genes. These proteins are characterized by their ability to be tethered to particular regulatory sequences in the genes that they control. While many other proteins participate in the regulation of gene expression, we limit our definition of transcription factors here to proteins that often contain a characteristic structural motif, the DNA-binding domain, which is involved in recognizing a short (usually 4–8 bp) DNA sequence. Based on the structure of the DNA-binding domain, transcription factors are classified into 50 to 60 different families, and in plants, 5% to 7% of all the protein-encoding genes are transcription factors, making them, collectively, perhaps the largest functional class of proteins.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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