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Title: Utilization of leaf litter as a potential feed source

Author
item Smith, Jason
item Neel, James - Jim
item Felton, Eugene E

Submitted to: American Society of Animal Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/14/2009
Publication Date: 3/16/2009
Citation: Smith, J.K., Neel, J.P., Felton, E.D. 2009. Utilization of leaf litter as a potential feed source. (abstract). In: Proceedings of the American Society of Animal Science, Midwestern Section Annual Meeting, March 16-18, 2009, Des Moines, IA. 2009 CD-ROOM.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Proximate analysis and In-situ nylon bag ruminal dry matter degradation of fall dropped Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip poplar) and Quercus alba (white oak) leaves were used to determine their potential use as a feed source for ruminant livestock animals. Ash content was 8.24 and 4.69 percent, respectively. Crude protein, as determined by the Kjeldahl procedure, was 6.81 and 5.99 percent for poplar and oak, of which 5.63 and 4.72 percent was soluble, respectively. Neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and acid detergent lignin of poplar leaves was 36.25, 25.18, and 6.15 percent, respectively. With the poplar leaves, 1.82 percent of the CP was bound to the NDF fraction, and 0.95 percent was bound to the ADF fraction. Neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and acid detergent lignin of oak leaves were 39.93, 30.23, and 8.89 percent, respectively. Similar to poplar, 1.36 percent of the CP in the oak leaves was bound to the NDF fraction, and 0.99 percent was bound to the ADF fraction. Ether extract was found to be 4.51 and 4.66 percent for poplar and oak, respectively. Ruminal dry matter digestibility at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours was determined in triplicate via a switch back design in the rumen of two lactating dairy cows fed a corn silage/grass haylage based diet. In-situ DMD differed (p<0.001) for each leaf species at each of the respective time points. Dry matter digestibility of poplar and oak leaves was 24.86 vs. 22.57, 26.66 vs. 23.61, 28.44 vs. 24.38, 31.15 vs. 24.13, 36.61 vs. 27.15, 47.91 vs. 30.51, 57.90 vs. 40.74, 65.59 vs. 46.89, and 68.45 vs. 49.29 percent at the respective hours. Dry matter digestibility of poplar and oak leaves appear to have similar (p<0.05) rates of digestion up to approximately 4 hours of digestion, with poplar having an increased (p<0.05) rate of digestion at time points after 4 hours of incubation. Further examination is necessary to determine potential incorporation in complete diets.