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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Climate Change and Evolution of Vector Associated Pathogens: Potential to Increase or Decrease Duration and Intensity of Epidemics)

Author
item Linthicum, Kenneth - Ken
item Britch, Seth
item Anyamba, Assaf
item Small, Jennifer
item Pak, Ed
item Tucker, Compton
item Chretien, Jean-paul

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/24/2008
Publication Date: 11/24/2008
Citation: Linthicum, K., Britch, S.C., Anyamba, A., Small, J., Pak, E., Tucker, C.J., Chretien, J. 2008. Climate Change and Evolution of Vector Associated Pathogens: Potential to Increase or Decrease Duration and Intensity of Epidemics. Presented at the Climate Changes and Changes in Epidemiology Meeting in Anncey/Les Pensieres, France on November 24-26, 2008.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Population growth, frontier agricultural expansion, and urbanization transform the landscape and the surrounding ecosystem, affecting climate, diseases, and interactions between animals and humans. Additionally, the Earth’s oceans serve as the engine of the Earth’s climate and ecosystems, and they are closely linked. Several examples will be used to demonstrate that we share a global environment that strongly influences vector-borne disease transmission. First, we will describe how temperature plays a major role in the ability of Ae. aegypti to transmit dengue virus in Southeast Asia and possibly chikungunya virus in Africa. Second, we will describe how rainfall affects the ability of Aedes and Culex species to transmit RVF in sub-Saharan Africa. Third, we will describe how modifications to environment such as the construction of a dam and development of rice irrigation projects affect the ability of Culex species to transmit RVF in Mauritania and Senegal. During periods of elevated transmission there is a significantly increased risk of globalization of these and other arboviruses. The ability to predict periods of elevated risk might permit us to design better prevention, containment, or exclusion strategies to limit globalization of these and other pathogens.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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