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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Inactivating Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Other Pathogens by Bacteriocins OR-7 and E 50-52.)

Author
item Svetoch, Edward
item Levchuk, Vladimir
item Pokhilenko, Victor
item Eruslanov, Boris
item Mitsevich, Evgenii
item Mitsevich, Irina
item Perelygin, Vladimir
item Stepanshin, Yuri
item Stern, Norman

Submitted to: Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer reviewed journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/22/2008
Publication Date: N/A
Citation:

Interpretive Summary: Worldwide, reports document an increased frequency of multiple-antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. Other pathogens are recognized as unresponsive to antibiotics. These previously treatable infections now account for increased numbers of disease following exposure. This report documents a novel set of bacteriocins capable of killing a wide variety of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC; 'g/ml) of bacteriocins OR-7, E 50-52, nisin and 20 selected antibiotics were determined against 15 diverse antibiotic resistant clinical isolates. Very low concentrations (generally, <1 µg/ml) of OR-7 and E 50-52 killed each of the antibiotic-resistant clinical isolates. These bacteriocins represent an alternative means for treating clinical infections.

Technical Abstract: Worldwide, reports document the increasing frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Other human pathogens are recognized as unresponsive to antibiotics of last resort. These previously treatable infections now account for increased numbers of human disease and deaths following severe surface wounds or exposure to nosocomial sources. This report documents a novel set of bacteriocins capable of killing MRSA and other refractile, antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC; 'g/ml) of bacteriocins OR-7, E 50-52 and nisin and, 20 selected antibiotics were tested against 15 antibiotic resistant clinical isolates. Very low concentrations (generally, < 1 µg/ml) of OR-7 and E 50-52 killed each of the antibiotic-resistant clinical isolates. These bacteriocins represent a novel alternative for treating clinical infections.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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