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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #231752

Title: Adventitious Root Formation of Forest Trees and Horticultural Plants - From Genes to Applications

Author
item NIEMI, KAROLIINA
item Scagel, Carolyn

Submitted to: Adventitious Root Formation of Forest Trees and Horticultural Plants - From Genes to Applications
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/1/2008
Publication Date: 3/1/2009
Citation: Niemi, K., Scagel, C.F. eds. 2009. Adventitious Root Formation of Forest Trees and Horticultural Plants - From Genes to Applications. Adventitious Root Formation of Forest Trees and Horticultural Plants - From Genes to Applications. Kerala, India. Research Signpost. 408 p.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Adventitious root formation is a key step in the clonal propagation of forest trees and horticultural crops. Difficulties in forming adventitious roots (ARs) on stem cuttings and plants produced in vitro hinders the propagation of elite trees and efficient production of many horticultural plant species. This book contains chapters by several authors summarizing our current knowledge of different aspects of adventitious rooting from research on molecular regulation of AR formation, biochemical changes with AR formation, and the influence of stock plant physiology on rooting to the application of principles. Topics addressed include (1) the molecular basis for the role of auxins, nitric oxide, and diphenylurea derivatives in adventitious rooting; (2) genetic control and architecture of adventitious rooting in forest trees; (3) genes involved in AR formation using model plant and experimental systems; (4) improvement of rooting using rol genes; and (5) stock plant and cutting biochemical and physiological processes that influence AR formation. Additionally, the book contains several chapters describing how this knowledge has been translated into applications in forestry and horticulture, including (1) in vitro AR formation; (2) rooting of bamboos, chestnut, and walnut; (3) clonal propagation and selection strategies for Eucalyptus and Populus spp.; (4) the use of mycorrhizal fungi as a tool to improve AR formation; and (5) ecological adaptations associated with AR formation. The directions for future research and application of information on AR formation are also discussed.