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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Patterns of Cellular Gene Expression in Swine Macrophages Infected with Highly Virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia

Author
item Borca, Manuel
item Gudmundsdottir, Ingigerdur
item Fernandez-sainz, Ignacio
item Holinka, Lauren
item Risatti, Guillermo

Submitted to: Virus Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/21/2008
Publication Date: 10/10/2008
Citation: Borca, M.V., Gudmundsdottir, I., Fernandez-Sainz, I.J., Holinka-Patterson, L.G., Risatti, G.R. 2008. Patterns of Cellular Gene Expression in Swine Macrophages Infected with Highly Virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia. Virus Research (138): 89-96

Interpretive Summary: Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) strain Brescia causes an invariably fatal disease in infected swine. Host mechanisms involved in this severe outcome of infection have not been clearly established. To understand these mechanisms, we analyzed the response of primary cultured swine macrophages, a CSFV primary target cell, to infection with the CSFV virulent Brescia strain. We analyzed the level of specific activation of 58 host genes involved in the development of immune responses and inflammation using reverse transcription real-time PCR analysis. We found that eighteen of those genes specifically showed altered expression upon infection with CSFV. The identified genes are known to be associated with mechanisms of innate immune response and antiviral activity as well with the induction of inflammatory reactions. Data gathered here suggests that the observed gene expression profile might explain immunological and pathological changes associated with virulent CSFV infections.

Technical Abstract: Experimental exposure of swine to highly virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) strain Brescia causes an invariably fatal disease of all infected animals by 8 to 14 days post-infection. Host mechanisms involved in this severe outcome of infection have not been clearly established. To understand these mechanisms, we analyzed the activity of relevant immune genes in swine macrophages, a CSFV primary target cell, during the infection with the Brescia strain. The results indicated that eighteen genes showed a clearly altered activity. For example, a group of important cytokines (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-12p35, INF alpha, and INF beta), which regulate immune response; or chemokines (IL-8, AMCF-1, AMCF-2, MCP-2, and RANTES), which regulate cell migration during the inflammatory process; and in a group of very important intracellular substances that modulate gene activation call toll-like receptors (TLR-3, TLR-5, TLR-9, and TLR-10). Data gathered here suggests that the observed gene expression profile might explain immunological and pathological changes associated with virulent CSFV infections.

Last Modified: 08/22/2017
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