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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #227574

Title: Dietary patterns and the insulin resistance phenotype among non-diabetic adults

Author
item LIU, ENJU
item MCKEOWN, NICOLA
item NEWBY, PK
item MEIGS, JAMES
item VASAN, RMACHANDRAN
item D'AGOSTINO, RALPH
item QUATROMONI, PA
item Jacques, Paul

Submitted to: Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/26/2007
Publication Date: 4/7/2008
Citation: Liu, E., McKeown, N.M., Newby, P., Meigs, J.B., Vasan, R.S., D'Agostino, R.B., Quatromoni, P., Jacques, P. 2008. Dietary patterns and the insulin resistance phemotype among non-diabetic adults. Experimental Biology. Abstract No. 3088.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Background: Information on the relation between dietary patterns derived by cluster analysis and insulin resistance is scarce. Objective: To compare insulin resistance phenotypes, including waist circumference, body mass index, fasting and 2-hour post-challenge insulin, insulin sensitivity index (ISI0,120), HDL cholesterol, and triacylglycerol across the dietary patterns identified by cluster analysis. Design: Dietary patterns and insulin resistance phenotypes were assessed in a cross-sectional study of 2,875 non-diabetic subjects participating in the Framingham Offspring Study at the fifth examination cycle. Results: Four dietary patterns were identified (Healthy, Sweet, Alcohol, and Soda). After adjusting for multiple comparisons and potential confounders, in comparison to the Healthy pattern, fasting insulin was significantly higher in the Soda pattern (29.3 vs. 27.1µU/mL). Compared to the Healthy pattern, the Alcohol pattern had significantly lower 2-hour post-challenge insulin (65.6 vs. 75.8µU/mL), higher ISI 0,120 (28.1 vs. 26.6) and higher HDL cholesterol concentrations (55.5 vs. 48.5 mg/dL). Conclusions: Compared to the healthy dietary pattern, individuals in the soda pattern had higher fasting insulin, while those in the Alcohol pattern had better insulin sensitivity. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of beverage consumption on insulin sensitivity.