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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Whiteflies)

Author
item Bethke, J
item Canas, L
item Chamberlin, J
item Cloyd, R
item Dobbs, J
item Fletcher, R
item Fujino, D
item Gilrein, D
item Lindquist, R
item Ludwig, S
item Mckenzie, Cindy
item Oetting, R
item Osborne, L
item Palmer, C
item Sanderson, J

Submitted to: SAF Annual Conference on Insect & Disease Management on Ornamentals
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/15/2008
Publication Date: 2/28/2008
Citation: Bethke, J., Canas, L., Chamberlin, J., Cloyd, R., Dobbs, J., Fletcher, R., Fujino, D., Gilrein, D., Lindquist, R., Ludwig, S., McKenzie, C.L., Oetting, R., Osborne, L., Palmer, C., Sanderson, J. 2008. Whiteflies. Society of American (SAF) Florists, Proceedings of the 24th Annual Conference on Pest and Disease Management in Ornamentals. XXIV: 32-50.

Interpretive Summary: Whiteflies have long been considered major pests of ornamental plants. Until Bemisia tabaci (biotype B) was found attacking an array of ornamental plants in Florida greenhouses in 1986, the primary pest species was the greenhouse whitefly. The Q biotype of B. tabaci was detected in Arizona in 2004 and is problematic because of its propensity to develop insecticide resistance. This article provides information on whitefly biology, damage, sampling, management, pesticide resistance. Two management plans are presented, one targeted at controlling whitefly on plants intended for export and another with emphasis on controlling the Q biotype. These management programs are available on line at www.mrec.ifas.ufl.edu/LSO/bemisia/bemisia.htm.

Technical Abstract: Whiteflies have long been considered a major pest of ornamentals. Before 1986, the primary pest species was the greenhouse whitefly until Bemisia tabaci was found attacking an array of ornamental plants in Florida greenhouses. The Q biotype was detected in Arizona in 2004 and is problematic because of its propensity to develop insecticide resistance. Sections in the paper include description and biology, feeding damage and symptoms, detection and sampling, management and what can be done to manage pesticide resistance in B. tabaci. A letter from the Ad Hoc Whitefly Task Force which is comprised of Federal and State Regulatory Agencies, Ornamentals-Cotton-Vegetable Industries, and a Scientific Technical Working Group (Q-TAC) was included to ornamental growers on recommendations for dealing with whiteflies. A whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) management program for plants for planting intended for export as well as a management program for whiteflies on propagated ornamentals with an emphasis on the Q biotype was included in the proceedings. Management programs were developed based on insecticide trials conducted thru the Q TAC and are also available on line at www.mrec.ifas.ufl.edu/LSO/bemisia/bemisia.htm.

Last Modified: 05/24/2017
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