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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Fat-soluble vitamin and micromineral concentrations in preruminant dairy calves fed to achieve different growth rates)

Author
item Nonnecke, Brian
item Foote, Monica
item Horst, Ronald
item Waters, Wade
item Miller, B
item Johnson, T
item Fowler, M

Submitted to: Electronic Publication
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/18/2008
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Citation: Nonnecke, B.J., Foote, M.R., Horst, R.L., Waters, W.R., Miller, B.L., Johnson, T.E., Fowler, M. 2008. Fat-soluble vitamin and micromineral concentrations in preruminant dairy calves fed to achieve different growth rates. Iowa State University Animal Industry Report 2008. A.S. Leaflet R2298. Available: http://www.ans.iastate.edu/report/air/2008pdf/R2298.pdf.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Calf nutrition programs often limit nutrient intake from milk replacer during the first few weeks of life to promote dry-feed intake and early weaning. Recent studies indicate that feeding increased amounts of milk replacer with higher protein concentration improves growth performance and feed efficiency of preruminant calves. Because effects of growth rate on the bioavailability of endocrines and micronutrients have not been characterized, we examined the effects of no-, low-, and high-growth rates on fat-soluble vitamin (vitamins A, E, and D) and micromineral (copper and zinc) status in preruminant calves. Growth rates for no-growth (0.11 kg/d), low-growth (0.58 kg/d), and high-growth (1.16 kg/d) calves differed throughout the study. Of the micronutrients evaluated, vitamin E was most affected by growth rate. Vitamin E levels were lowest in high growth rate calves suggesting that feeding to achieve a high growth rate increases the demand for vitamin E. Because this vitamin is an essential antioxidant with an established role in infectious disease resistance, increased supplementation of high growth rate calves with vitamin E may be justified.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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