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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Using Crossover Breakpoints in Recombinant Inbred Lines to Identify Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling the Global Recombination Frequency)

Author
item Buckler, Edward - Ed
item Esch, Elisabeth
item Szymaniak, Jessica
item Yates, Heather
item Wojciech, Pawlowski

Submitted to: Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/28/2007
Publication Date: 11/15/2007
Citation: Buckler Iv, E.S., Esch, E., Szymaniak, J., Yates, H., Wojciech, P. 2007. Using Crossover Breakpoints in Recombinant Inbred Lines to Identify Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling the Global Recombination Frequency. Genetics. 177:1851-1858.

Interpretive Summary: Recombination is a crucial component of evolution and breeding, producing new genetic combinations on which selection can act. In this study, by examining recombination events captured in recombinant inbred mapping populations previously created for maize, wheat, Arabidopsis, and mouse, we demonstrate that substantial variation exists for genome-wide crossover rates in both outcrossed and inbred plant and animal species. We also identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control this variation. The method that we developed and employed here holds promise for elucidating factors that regulate meiotic recombination and for creation of hyper-recombinogenic lines, which can help overcome limited recombination that hampers breeding progress.

Technical Abstract: Recombination is a crucial component of evolution and breeding, producing new genetic combinations on which selection can act. Rates of recombination vary tremendously, not only between species but also within species and for specific chromosomal segments. In this study, by examining recombination events captured in recombinant inbred mapping populations previously created for maize, wheat, Arabidopsis, and mouse, we demonstrate that substantial variation exists for genome-wide crossover rates in both outcrossed and inbred plant and animal species. We also identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control this variation. The method that we developed and employed here holds promise for elucidating factors that regulate meiotic recombination and for creation of hyper-recombinogenic lines, which can help overcome limited recombination that hampers breeding progress.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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