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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #217446

Title: Relationship between Rust Mites, Calepitrimerus vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae), Bud Mites Colomeris vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae) and Short Shoot Syndrome in Oregon Vineyards

Author
item WALTON, VAUGHN
item DREVES, AMY
item Gent, David - Dave
item JAMES, DAVID
item Martin, Robert
item CHAMBERS, UTE
item SKINKIS, PATRICIA

Submitted to: International Journal of Acarology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/22/2007
Publication Date: 11/15/2007
Citation: Walton, V.M., Dreves, A., Gent, D.H., James, D.G., Martin, R.R., Chambers, U., Skinkis, P.A. 2007. Relationship between rust mites, Calepitrimerus vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae), bud mites Colomeris vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae) and short shoot syndrome in Oregon vineyards. International Journal of Acarology. 33:307-318.

Interpretive Summary: Short shoot syndrome (SSS) was first reported in Oregon in 2001 and has since been reported in all grape growing areas of Oregon and Washington. This syndrome is similar to the Restricted Spring Growth reported from Australia and similar symptoms have been reported in Europe. The short shoot syndrome can result in severe crop losses in Oregon vineyards due to bunch necrosis and near complete fruit abortion during the early part of the season. Other symptoms include malformed leaves, unusually short and angled shoots, scar tissue and bronzed leaves close to harvest time. It was determined that SSS found in Oregon vineyards is closely associated with rust mite, Calepitrimerus vitis (Nalepa) infestations. Very few bud mites, Colomeris vitis (Pagenstecher), were found in the vineyards during the current year and no relationship could be found between bud mite and symptoms. During winter, rust mites are dormant and no evidence of direct bud damage was found inside undeveloped buds. Tissue damage from mites was first observed between bud break and the two-leaf stage in mite infested vineyards. Rust mite colonies were found under outer bud scales and bark of canes close to the buds. Crop losses as high as 23.7% were directly linked to rust mite infestations and SSS from several vineyards sampled in Oregon.

Technical Abstract: The short shoot syndrome (SSS) causes severe crop losses in Oregon vineyards due to bunch necrosis during the early part of the season. Other symptoms include malformed leaves, unusually short and angled shoots, scar tissue and bronzed leaves close to harvest time. It was determined that SSS found in Oregon vineyards is closely associated with rust mite, Calepitrimerus vitis (Nalepa) infestations. Very few bud mites, Colomeris vitis (Pagenstecher), were found in the vineyards during the current year and no relationship could be found between symptoms and population densities During winter, rust mites are dormant and no evidence of direct bud damage from rust mites was found inside undeveloped buds. Tissue damage from mites was first observed between bud break and the two-leaf stage in mite infested vineyards. Rust mite colonies were found under outer bud scales and bark of canes close to the buds. Crop losses as high as 23.7% were directly linked to rust mite infestations and SSS from several vineyards sampled in Oregon.